#GoodbyePhilae: mosaic poster and goodbye video

28.09.2016 | posted by Fabian Walker

For some weeks, under the cross-platform hashtag #GoodbyePhilae, we collected the goodbyes you sent to Philae on Comet 67P. On Twitter and Instagram alone, the hashtag reached 47 million users – almost 7000 people around the world took part in the campaign to say farewell to the first man-made object to land on a comet. read more

Anniversary of Philae comet landing – expecting the unexpected

12.11.2015

One year ago today, the Philae lander touched down on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This was no easy task, of course. With the Rosetta mission, it was demonstrated that it was not only possible to travel to a comet more than 500 million kilometres from Earth, but also to follow it in its orbit around the Sun and land on it. read more

Philae calling ...

18.09.2015

On 9 July, the team at the DLR Lander Control Center made contact with Philae for the last time. Towards the end of October, Rosetta will come closer and attempts to communicate will resume. read more

Kometenlandung (#CometLanding) von Philae am 12. November 2014

Video – Pieces of the Puzzle – Philae on Comet 67P

12.08.2015 | posted by Fabian Walker

Philae's landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (#CometLanding) on 12 November 2014 was a historic moment – the first time in the history of space exploration that a spacecraft landed on a comet. Millions of people across the world followed the Rosetta mission via the Internet. read more

Closing in on Rosetta's target comet

24.07.2014 | posted by Elke Heinemann

Surface structures are becoming visible in new images of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. These images, with a resolution of 100 metres per pixel, were acquired with the OSIRIS scientific imaging system on board Rosetta. The comet’s neck region – the section connecting the two heads – seems to be much brighter than the head and body of the nucleus. read more

Philae in der Testanlage des DLR

T minus 377 days!

30.10.2013

377 days remain, just over one year– quite a significant amount of time. Considering that the duration of the mission up to landing is 3906 days, this is merely the final10 percent of a 10-year-long journey through interplanetary space. read more

Mascot

MASCOT: A 'shoebox' with complex inner workings

21.08.2013 | posted by Christian Grimm

The 'small’ asteroid lander MASCOT will set off for asteroid 1999 JU3 on board the Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission at the end of 2014. Although from the outside it seems to be the size of a shoebox, the lander’s stature is deceiving! Its sophisticated and highly developed payload, and its powerful communication and computing system make MASCOT a high-tech, albeit very compact, autonomous spacecraft, perfectly equipped to cope with the arduous and long mission it faces. read more

STS-135 Atlantis – the final episode

22.07.2011

The Space Shuttle Atlantis announced its arrival at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in the early morning hours of 21 July 2011 with a double sonic boom. Just over three minutes later, the spaceship touched down on the runway and at 05:57:54 local time "wheels stop" was called for the last time. Atlantis and its crew had safely returned to Earth. NASA's space shuttles have travelled into orbit 135 times; this era ended today. The space shuttles have shaped US space policy for the last 30 years and have stood as an icon of human spaceflight for a whole generation. read more