EnergyBlog
 
 

Energy question of the week: How much longer will world reserves of the nuclear fuel uranium last?

25. October 2010, 11.06
As controversial as nuclear power is, with its still unresolved risks, waste storage problems and high capital costs, it currently meets about 14 percent of global electrical power demand through 430 power stations. However, as is the case with crude oil, coal or natural gas, reserves of uranium 235 – the fuel used in atomic power stations – are finite, meaning that they will run out one day. This poses a simple question: how much longer will our natural uranium reserves last?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: What techniques are available for storing energy?

18. October 2010, 10.00
Batteries are certainly the most familiar energy storage devices – reliable, available everywhere and convenient. Rechargeable batteries are ideal for cell phones and electric cars, but for large amounts of energy, to overcome shortages in the power grid, they are not the best solution. What other options are available to us today?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: Why is energy storage so important?

11. October 2010, 10.20
Whether driving a car, switching on a light, or turning up the heating – we take it for granted that there'll be sufficient energy for us to use at that very moment. But this only works if two basics are in place. Firstly, energy needs to be transported quickly and reliably to the consumer in the required form. Second, energy storage guarantees straightforward access and acts as an 'energy buffer' to fill the gaps in distribution. So, what kinds of storage do we get our everyday energy from?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: Is complete self-sufficiency possible with decentralised power stations?

04. October 2010, 09.18
Nearly 80 percent of the electricity used in Europe comes from central power plants to the consumer via the electrical grid. As the popularity of renewable power sources has risen, consumer awareness of the importance of decentralised power production has also grown. The trend for decentralised and intelligent electricity production enjoys further support from projects for networked thermal power stations. Does this technology have the potential to provide an all-inclusive power supply?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken