EnergyBlog
 
 

Energy question of the week: Can burning ice solve our energy problems?

28. June 2010, 10.19
Crude oil, coal and natural gas are not the only fossil fuels hidden deep below the surface of the Earth. Right around the globe, enormous quantities of methane hydrates can be found as many people already know, especially since Frank Schätzings famous novel 'The Swarm' (Der Schwarm). This white combustible ice consists of water and methane gas. If thawed in a controlled fashion, many billions of tons of methane could be obtained from it. The question is: do methane hydrate have a genuine role to play in our energy future?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: Will the trains of the future be faster and more economical?

21. June 2010, 11.37
On 3 April 2007, during a record breaking attempt using a modified train on specially prepared track, a French TGV travelled at 574.8 kilometres per hour through the French Département of Marne – an speed record for railway trains that still stands. In normal service, TGV trains run at around 320 kph. And Germany's 67 ICE3 trains are capable of reaching 300 kilometres per hour. Will the trains of the future be even faster and still be an economical form of transport?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: Can solar power be stored?

14. June 2010, 10.09
Solar power stations generate electricity only when it is sunny. So they do not exactly have a great reputation as reliable power providers. But this disadvantage can be overcome with efficient forms of low-cost heat storage. Many ideas are currently being tested, and some of these are even in use. How do storage facilities go about of storing solar power?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: How does one weigh the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide?

07. June 2010, 10.53
Automotive manufacturers are now required to indicate the precise level of carbon dioxide emissions for every new car. Small, low-emission cars seldom exceed 100 grams of carbon dioxide per kilometre. Gas-guzzling luxury saloons or SUVs (large off-road vehicles or pickups for example) can emit more than three times these levels into the atmosphere. But carbon dioxide is a gas. How does one actually put a gas on a set of scales?
Jan Oliver Löfken
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Jan Oliver Löfken