EnergyBlog
 
 

Energy question of the week: Bicycles replacing cars - the future of e-mobility?

27. September 2010, 10.47
According to estimates by the German Federal Government, even though today there are few mass-produced electric cars on the market, there will be a million electric cars on German roads by 2020. Despite numerous pilot projects using electric cars, high expectations are being curbed because of high purchase costs, short ranges and a lack of infrastructure for charging stations. On the other hand, sales of two-wheeled electric vehicles such as scooters and bicycles are breaking all records. So is the electric bicycle replacing the car in terms of e-mobility?
Jan Oliver Löfken
Posted by
Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: How much energy can be saved by using the successors to incandescent light bulbs?

17. September 2010, 14.04
Gradually, the lights are going out over Europe; but this time, only the incandescent ones. Last year, the EU banned the sale of 100- and 75-watt bulbs, and 60-watt bulbs followed them a few weeks ago. By 2012, incandescent bulbs – which transform only five percent of their input power into light and the rest into heat – will no longer be on sale anywhere in Europe. But what will the result of this ban be?
Jan Oliver Löfken
Posted by
Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: What part does natural gas play in meeting Germany’s energy requirements?

13. September 2010, 10.04
Whether used for heating, as a vehicle fuel or for power generation in gigantic turbines, natural gas plays a central role in Germany’s national energy supply. With consumption at 100 billion cubic metres a year, its use – and also importation – has almost doubled since 1970; and this trend is still growing. But does such a development make sense?
Jan Oliver Löfken
Posted by
Jan Oliver Löfken
 
 

Energy question of the week: Which fuel offers the most efficient energy storage?

03. September 2010, 15.37
Whether on the road, by sea or in the air – the basis of modern transport systems is the internal combustion engine. Hardly any other invention has resulted in so many variants in just 100 years of development. One of the reasons for the technical success of diesel and petrol combustion engines is the high energy content of the fuel they burn. But how much energy do fossil fuels really contain, in comparison with hydrogen or lithium ion batteries?
Jan Oliver Löfken
Posted by
Jan Oliver Löfken