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More bandwidth for Earth observation

26. November 2015

Mobile telephones, high-speed Internet, up-to-date meteorological data and navigation programs available anytime, anywhere – all thanks to satellites. Bandwidth and frequencies that are revised every three to four years at the World Radiocommunication Conference play an important role in this.

urorae Chaos %2d der Übergang von den Valles Marineris zu den großen Ausflusstälern auf dem Mars

Aurorae Chaos – the transition from Valles Marineris to the large outflow channel systems

19. November 2015

The latest images acquired by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), operated by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express spacecraft, show a runout of the Aurorae Chaos region – an eastern continuation of the massive Valles Marineris graben system on Mars.


The Philae lander – three 'feet' on the ground, and all set to go

12. November 2015

Philae was more than 500 million kilometres from Earth when it touched down on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko one year ago, on 12 November 2014. "We looked after and planned this mission for almost 20 years and launched the Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander on their journey through space – so landing day really was quite special," says Philae Project Manager Stephan Ulamec from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) to sum up the mood on the day.


Peering through smoke – DLR satellite TET-1 delivers detailed images of the fires in Indonesia

30. October 2015

Indonesia is on fire – the island state is currently facing a bitter struggle against forest and peat fires on Sumatra and Borneo, most likely caused by illegal 'slash and burn' farming to clear the land for palm oil or timber plantations. The extremely dry conditions resulting from the El Niño weather phenomenon exacerbate this problem.

ISS Expedition 1

Fifteen years of astronauts living together on the ISS

30. October 2015

When astronaut William Shepherd left Earth on 31 October 2000 aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, he made his way to a very special residence. At an altitude of approximately 400 kilometres, it offered an unobstructed view of Earth and no risk of meeting unfriendly neighbours.

Every rocket is one-of-a-kind – premiere of the DLR student programme STERN

27. October 2015

The students cheered – the DECAN (Deutsche CanSat Höhenrakete) research rocket took off from the Esrange Space Center in north Sweden at 02:53 on 27 October 2015 and proceeded to reach an altitude of roughly 5.5 kilometres. The rocket was designed, built and launched by a team of students from Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin) as part of the new STERN (Studentische Experimental-Raketen) German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) programme.

Ozonloch Anfang Oktober 2015

Ozone hole nears record size again

23. October 2015

The ozone hole over Antarctica currently extends over 26 million square kilometres – an area larger than the North American continent. Currently, it is approximately 2.5 million square kilometres larger than at the same time in 2014. In 2006 it was larger than now, at 27 million square kilometres.

Täler Mangala und Minio auf dem Mars

Enormous masses of water flowed through Mangala Valles and Minio Vallis on Mars

15. October 2015

During Mars' geological 'Middle Ages' – the Hesperian Period – which began 3.7 billion years ago and lasted until approximately 3.1 billion years ago, strong volcanic activity was present on our neighbouring planet. Volcanoes spewed low viscosity lava that poured out in masses over the surface and gave rise to extensive plains.

Der NASA%2dAstronaut Mark Watney ist "Der Marsianer" im gleichnamigen Film

Following the path of 'The Martian' – video generated using images acquired by the Mars Express orbiter

5. October 2015

"In your face, Neil Armstrong!" – as he says these words, NASA astronaut Mark Watney senses for the first time that he might have only a very small chance of getting out of his predicament alive. Watney is 'The Martian' in the film of the same name (release date in Germany: 8 October) who, in a not too distant future, finds himself stranded on the Red Planet.

Dwarf planet Ceres – new name, new maps, new questions

30. September 2015

This week, scientists at the European Planetary Science Conference (EPSC) in Nantes, France are busy with the mysterious crater structures and fascinating views of the multifaceted dwarf planet Ceres. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is involved in the NASA Dawn mission and, among other things, is responsible for the mapping and naming of regions and striking surface features, in collaboration with the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

67P im Weitwinkel

Churyumov-Gerasimenko – mystery of the 'rubber duck' shape solved

28. September 2015

Shaped like a rubber duck – this was the talk upon the discovery of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's surprising shape in July 2014. Scientists were amazed at the celestial body's extraordinary shape, which was revealed by the European Rosetta spacecraft.

Komet 67P/Churyumov%2dGerasimenko

Steam under the hood - an insight into ice patterns on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

23. September 2015

Gas and dust streams from the ‘neck’ of Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko Since its arrival at the comet, Rosetta has observed jets of gas and dust. Numerous gas eruptions have been observed originating from the ‘neck’ of the comet. Using the measurements performed by the VIRTIS spectrometer, it has been possible to recognise a day/night cycle of cometary activity and identify the mechanism responsible.

More than 60,000 visitors at DLR for German Aerospace Day

20. September 2015

Over 60,000 guests visited the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Cologne-Porz site on 20 September 2015 for German Aerospace Day. DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA), together with their partners, exhibited current research projects and missions in the fields of aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security.

Mars Express - Summer in the southern hemisphere of Mars

10. September 2015

The primary task of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft is to acquire high-resolution image data for the mapping of Mars. For this purpose, the optical system is normally directed perpendicular to the surface of the planet.

Krater Occator

Ceres – crater walls steeper than the north face of the Eiger

9. September 2015

The north face of the Eiger in the Bernese Alps is legendary; mountaineers consider the steep walls of the 1800-metre drop to be a difficult and challenging climb. But 326 million kilometres from Earth, the sheer cliffs of the Eiger find their match on the dwarf planet Ceres, where at some points, the wall of the Occator crater towers precipitously at a height of almost 2000 metres.


Mercury rotates faster than expected

9. September 2015

Nine seconds is not a lot – those who are nine seconds late for an appointment are, so to speak, on time. But when it comes to the rotation of a planet around its own axis, nine seconds is not insignificant. On Mercury, this means that a spot at the equator would, in four years, not be where one would expect it to be; it would have shifted by 700 metres.

Um die Auswirkungen der Schwerelosigkeit auf den menschlichen Körper zu simulieren, liegen die Probanden zum Kopf hin um sechs Grad geneigt.

'Terrestrial astronauts' for 60 days

27. August 2015

For the next few weeks, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) :envihab research facility will be home to 12 men in good health, aged between 20 and 45 years. The men are test subjects for a long-term bedrest study – they will be confined to bedrest for two months with two weeks of experimental investigations and tests. Their beds will be tilted at an angle of six degrees below the horizontal, so that their bodily fluids shift towards the upper body; the bones and muscles in their lower part of their bodies will lose strength as a result of the lack of movement. “In this way we simulate the effects of microgravity on the human body,” says Edwin Mulder, leader of the study and a scientist at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine, about the study, which is being carried out by DLR on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA). “Our volunteers are, so to speak, terrestrial astronauts.” Half of the test subjects will undergo reactive jump training several times a week, which involves lying on a specially positioned training device. “We want to see whether this very intensive training can be an effective countermeasure to the deterioration of the bones and muscles.”

Ceres – unusual landslides and unstable crater walls

25. August 2015

The lower the Dawn space probe flies over the dwarf planet Ceres with its on-board camera, the more puzzling – and exciting – the celestial body appears. “Some of the things we are seeing have never been seen anywhere else in the Solar System,” says Ralf Jaumann from the German Aerospace Center (DLR). “Except for on Earth.” Dawn is now looking down onto the surface of Ceres from an altitude of just 1470 kilometres. The first images acquired from its High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) show a ‘pyramid’ with unusual landslides, unstable crater walls and chains of mountains. “We can only speculate about these things at the moment.” Where the bright stripes along the pyramid-shaped mountain come from and whether the surface of the dwarf planet is comprised of different materials are questions that the planetary researchers are still trying to answer.

DLR at MAKS 2015 in Moscow

25. August 2015

The International Aviation and Space Salon MAKS 2015 is being held in Zhukovsky, near Moscow, from 25 to 30 August 2015. This is the sixth time that the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is exhibiting at the biennial Russian aerospace exhibition. With an exhibition space of 100 square metres, DLR will be presenting its concepts and technologies for the space and aeronautics of tomorrow. DLR satellite technology is the main focus of the exhibit.

Oleg Kononenko

Kontur-2 – Controlling robots remotely from space

19. August 2015

Although only about 400 kilometres separate the Kontur-2 joystick and the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) ROKVISS robot, the remote control operations that took place on 18 August 2015 were truly special: Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, flying aboard the International Space Station (ISS) over Earth at 28,000 kilometres per hour, controlled the robot on the ground while in microgravity. The connection between space and Earth is not one-directional – the ROKVISS (Robotic Components Verification on the ISS) sends data back to the joystick when contact forces occur on the ground. At 16:37 CEST (ISS orbit 3775), the metal fingers of the robot moved for the first time – controlled remotely from space. “At that moment, Kononenko not only saw what was happening using a camera, but, through the joystick, felt exactly what was happening with the robot in our laboratory,” says Jordi Artigas from the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics. In autumn 2015 the first ‘tele-handshake’ will be performed between the ISS and Earth with this technology, when the DLR Robot ‘Space Justin’ remotely shakes hands with someone on Earth from space – with force feedback.

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