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It is all in the mix – study of the efficiency of solar technologies presented

14. October 2016

How will the technologies for the production of electricity from solar energy develop in the coming decades? Which technology is the most economical? What opportunities do the combination of multiple systems offer? A study conducted under the leadership of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) examined the future development of photovoltaic and solar thermal power plants up to 2030.

ExoMars

Separate paths for ExoMars - The Schiaparelli probe will separate from its parent spacecraft on 16 October 2016

14. October 2016

Since 14 March 2016, the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and the Schiaparelli lander have been flying together towards Mars for the ESA ExoMars mission. On 16 October 2016, the journey to the Martian surface begins for the lander, while the TGO will enter orbit around Mars.

Trend check for low-cost airlines – the long-haul business is taking off

7. October 2016

Norwegian Air and Eurowings are increasingly targeting destinations outside Europe, while Ryanair is continuing to shake up the German market and is now expanding its position as market leader within Europe.

Die Mission Rosetta ist beendet. Um 13.19 Uhr (MESZ) setzte die Sonde auf dem Kometen 67P auf.

End of mission for Rosetta

30. September 2016

On 30 September 2016 at 13:19 CEST, the final signal from the Rosetta orbiter was received back on Earth. The ESA mission ended when the spacecraft touched down on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The international team of scientists had already said their farewells to the Philae lander back in February 2016, when its prolonged radio silence indicated that it would no longer report back to the team in the control centre at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR).

Company for the Philae lander

27. September 2016

The Philae landing craft touched down on comet on 12 November 2014. It has now been found: it is not located at the convenient site originally selected for its landing, but rather – following a series of three bounces – in a grim and dark environment.

EMSec – Maritime security

9. September 2016

Four days and four cases that pose a threat to maritime security – in several scenarios that took place between 5 and 9 September 2016, the EMSec joint project (Echtzeitdienste für die Maritime Sicherheit - Security; Real-Time Services for Maritime Security) was able to successfully demonstrate research findings from the last three years.

Comet lander Philae found

5. September 2016

The comet lander Philae has been found. The OSIRIS camera on board the Rosetta orbiter took the revealing images of the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 2 September 2016. They show the landing craft lying sideways in a crevasse. Two of the three landing legs are clearly visible.

EMSec

Hijacked ferries, searching for a man overboard and drifting popcorn

2. September 2016

In the Situation Centre, an alarm flashes on the screen – a passenger ferry has changed its planned course for no apparent reason. The AIS (Automatic Identification System) signal eventually disappears from the display. By now, all ship-specific information must have been requested and compared in order to quickly clarify the situation and take immediate action.

Hütte Regina Margherita

Altitude sickness for missions to Mars

22. August 2016

Headaches, nausea or even swollen hands and feet: the test subjects currently ascending at a rapid pace to Europe’s highest building to voluntarily experience altitude sickness have all of these things coming their way. Ten test subjects will gather at the Margherita Hut in the Valais Alps in Italy, where their bodies will be closely monitored to see how they respond to an altitude of 4554 metres above sea level, oxygen depletion and low air pressure. “If astronauts are stationed in a Mars habitat some time in the future, it is extremely probable that they will live and work in an atmosphere with similar pressure conditions,” explains Ulrich Limper, the mission’s medical director from the German Aerospace Center (DLR). “As things stand, though, we are unable to predict which persons will experience altitude sickness and what the causes may be.” A possible explanation: “The oxygen depletion encountered at high altitudes damages the vascular barrier, allowing fluid and proteins to seep into the connective tissue. In some instances, this will produce dangerous oedema in the body, especially in the lungs and the brain.”

Rosetta, Philae and comet fever

8. August 2016

It's hard to say what surprised scientists and engineers the most during the Rosetta mission: the unusual form of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that earned it the nickname 'Rubber Duck'? The bizarre, unexpectedly varied landscape with fissures, terraces, crevasses, steep cliffs and even dune-like structures?

 
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