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Coordinated measuring flights for climate research – gravity waves and airglow

28. January 2016

Gravity waves affect the climate and weather. For the first time ever, scientists from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), together with colleagues from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie; KIT) and the Jülich Research Centre (Forschungszentrum Jülich), as well as other national and international partners, have succeeded in measuring almost the entire life cycle of atmospheric gravity waves.

Video – autonomous landing at full speed

18. January 2016

An unmanned, electric, autonomous aircraft travelling at 75 kilometres per hour lands gently on the roof of a moving car. For the first time, researchers at the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) have successfully demonstrated a technique developed for this purpose.

A 'telehandshake' between the ISS and Earth

18. December 2015

Although it is a simple gesture of greeting, it nevertheless remains an extraordinary moment; a handshake between an astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) and researchers from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR).

HALO research aircraft – climate research high above the Arctic

10. December 2015

In the icy environment high above the Arctic and working in close cooperation with other German research institutes, scientists from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) are going to investigate the complex processes involved in climate change and their impact on the polar atmosphere.

More bandwidth for Earth observation

26. November 2015

Mobile telephones, high-speed Internet, up-to-date meteorological data and navigation programs available anytime, anywhere – all thanks to satellites. Bandwidth and frequencies that are revised every three to four years at the World Radiocommunication Conference play an important role in this.

TET%2dSatellitenaufnahmen

Peering through smoke – DLR satellite TET-1 delivers detailed images of the fires in Indonesia

30. October 2015

Indonesia is on fire – the island state is currently facing a bitter struggle against forest and peat fires on Sumatra and Borneo, most likely caused by illegal 'slash and burn' farming to clear the land for palm oil or timber plantations. The extremely dry conditions resulting from the El Niño weather phenomenon exacerbate this problem.

Every rocket is one-of-a-kind – premiere of the DLR student programme STERN

27. October 2015

The students cheered – the DECAN (Deutsche CanSat Höhenrakete) research rocket took off from the Esrange Space Center in north Sweden at 02:53 on 27 October 2015 and proceeded to reach an altitude of roughly 5.5 kilometres. The rocket was designed, built and launched by a team of students from Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin) as part of the new STERN (Studentische Experimental-Raketen) German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) programme.

A journey through an exhaust plume – DLR flight tests for alternative fuels

9. October 2015

Alternative fuels have the potential to support the environment- and climate-friendly developments in air transport. At present, global air traffic contributes towards almost five percent of global warming. In addition to the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, condensation trails and the resulting cirrus clouds lead to a significant climate impact.

Oleg Kononenko

Kontur-2 – Controlling robots remotely from space

19. August 2015

Although only about 400 kilometres separate the Kontur-2 joystick and the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) ROKVISS robot, the remote control operations that took place on 18 August 2015 were truly special: Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, flying aboard the International Space Station (ISS) over Earth at 28,000 kilometres per hour, controlled the robot on the ground while in microgravity. The connection between space and Earth is not one-directional – the ROKVISS (Robotic Components Verification on the ISS) sends data back to the joystick when contact forces occur on the ground. At 16:37 CEST (ISS orbit 3775), the metal fingers of the robot moved for the first time – controlled remotely from space. “At that moment, Kononenko not only saw what was happening using a camera, but, through the joystick, felt exactly what was happening with the robot in our laboratory,” says Jordi Artigas from the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics. In autumn 2015 the first ‘tele-handshake’ will be performed between the ISS and Earth with this technology, when the DLR Robot ‘Space Justin’ remotely shakes hands with someone on Earth from space – with force feedback.

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KONTUR-2 – remote control in space

22. July 2015

The new crew on their way to the International Space Station (ISS) – cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and astronauts Kimiya Yui and Kjell Lindgren – will be carrying a compact piece of luggage on board the Soyuz spacecraft. The KONTUR-2 joystick developed by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is setting off to its new destination. Upon arrival, Kononenko will be responsible for working with the device and in August will operate the ROKVISS (Robotic Components Verification on the ISS) robot installed at the DLR Robotics and Mechatronics Center using the remote control. What makes this special? The cosmonaut will not only see a camera image of the robot sent up from the ground, he will also, at a distance of over 400 kilometres, feel precisely what the robot back on Earth touches. This is enabled by a mechanism in KONTUR-2 that detects exactly how strongly it touches another object, as well as other metrics. The telepresence experiment is designed to give its operator the impression of being on-site at the laboratory – and not in orbit around Earth.

 
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