The basis for policy making

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  • HALO bei einem Flug 2009

    HALO in flight in 2009

    HALO is 31 metres long - 1.6 metres account for the nose probe. It has a height of 7.9 metres and a wingspan of 28.5 metres.

Human activities affect the atmosphere and the climate. International conventions such as the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols were the first important steps in limiting changes to the ozone layer and climate. Nevertheless, more extensive agreements on climate protection are required. A greater understanding of the processes that occur in our atmosphere is needed to create a sound basis for political decision-making in this regard. Reliable experimental data for understanding the atmosphere is an important building block for future, more accurate, climate predictions. The High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO) will make a significant contribution to our understanding of the atmosphere. Because of its excellent flight performance and measurement capabilities, HALO will open up a new dimension for environmental and climate research using aircraft in Germany and Europe.

Atmospheric research using aircraft - essential for climate and environmental research

Atmospheric research has a long tradition in Germany, and involves various disciplines ranging from laboratory studies, long-term observations and intensive field experiments to the analysis of satellite data and application of complex computer models. These approaches are closely interrelated and interdependent.

Research aircraft are essential for climate and environmental research. Aircraft used as observation platforms close the gap between ground-based observation stations and satellites. They have the advantage of being able to move freely in the atmosphere, and thus deliver instruments for targeted investigations to their exact intended place of operation. Compared to satellites, aircraft measurements have better spatial resolution, and aircraft have the advantage of being able to carry a comprehensive set of instruments. Aircraft are also used as test and development platforms for satellite instruments and for validating Earth- and space-bound systems.

DLR has been operating research aircraft for over 35 years, including the Falcon 20E jet that has been very successfully used since 1976. Therefore, DLR has extensive experience in the planning and execution of flight measurement campaigns.

Last modified:
23/08/2012 09:17:18