Studying meteorites under a microscope

Several tons of extra-terrestrial material hit the Earth's atmosphere every day. Most of the particles are so tiny that they burn up entirely, becoming visible only as meteors, if at all. Most of what is left drops into the oceans or on uninhabited country. For this reason, people almost never notice meteorites, apart from the romantic luminous traces they leave in the night sky. Yet they have had a crucial influence on the history of Earth, and they are still dangerous. At the Berlin DLR_School_Lab, young scientists may pursue this question and study transparent sections of meteorites under a polarising microscope.

Last modified: 17/08/2012 15:47:57

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Studying meteorites under a microscope

Meteoritenschliff unter dem Polarisationsmikroskop

Several tons of extra-terrestrial material hit the Earth's atmosphere every day. Most of the particles are so tiny that they burn up entirely, becoming visible only as meteors, if at all. Most of what is left drops into the oceans or on uninhabited country. At the Berlin DLR_School_Lab, young scientists may pursue this question and study transparent sections of meteorites under a polarising microscope.