Virtual flight around K2

K2 in the Himalayas is commonly regarded as one of the world's most beautiful mountains, but also as the eight-thousand-metre peak that is most difficult to climb. Scientists from DLR's Earth observation centre (EOC) have used this demanding region to test the latest methods for processing satellite data into 3-D models. The flanks of K2 are very steep; the resultant shadows as well as the extreme contrast between ice, snow, and dark rock make it hard to generate a precise 3-D model from optical satellite data. Therefore, the US satellite Worldview 2 was programmed to look at the ridges and peaks of K2 from three different angles. From these data, DLR researchers succeeded in computing a terrain model with a resolution of less than one metre per pixel – a worldwide first. The results helped mountaineers Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner and Ralf Dujmovits to optimise their preparations for their K2 ascent. Showing all conceivable ascent routes, the model illustrates the gigantic dimensions of this pyramid of rock an ice.

Last modified: 24/08/2012 14:06:39

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Northwest ridge of K2

Nordwestgrat des K2

The US satellite Worldview 2 was programmed to look at the ridges and peaks of K2 from three different angles. From these data, DLR researchers succeeded in computing a terrain model with a resolution of less than one metre per pixel – a worldwide first. The results helped mountaineers Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner and Ralf Dujmovits to optimise their preparations for their K2 ascent. Showing all conceivable ascent routes, the model illustrates the gigantic dimensions of this pyramid of rock an ice.

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  • Virtual flight around K2
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  • Gallery: K2 expedition
    (desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-10483)
  • DLR Earth Observation Center (EOC)
    (http://www.dlr.de/caf/en/)