ILA Berlin Air Show 2014

Tomorrow's world of aviation and aerospace – the DLR stand at ILA 2014

the DLR stand at ILA 2014
Autoplay
Show Info
Hide Info
Information
Close
Fullscreen
Normal
back
next
{{index}}/{{count}}
Tip:
Use <Escape>, to leave fullscreen.
  • Teil des DLR%2dStands auf der ILA Berlin Air Show 2014

    Part of the DLR stand at the ILA Berlin Air Show 2014

    At the ILA 2014 Berlin Air Show, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is showing it aerospace research results with more than 60 exhibits on the DLR stand (Hall 4), in the Space Pavilion and the Career Center, and on the BMWi (German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy) stand.

  • Flugzeug der Zukunft: Blended Wing Body

    Aircraft of the future – blended wing body

    The DLR Institute of Air Transportation Systems, as part of Airport 2030, is examining how a Blended Wing Body (BWB), whose shape significantly differs in comparison to conventional aircraft, fits into the operations at the airport of the future. Due to the higher positioning of the wings, the dispatch of a BWB aircraft will require some changes during refuelling, de-icing, engine checks and baggage handling. However, extensive use can still be made of the existing infrastructure.

  • Eu:CROPIS %2d Gewächshäuser im Satelliten

    Eu:CROPIS – satellite greenhouses

    In 2016, the satellite Eu:CROPIS will transport two small 'greenhouses' contained in a pressure vessel into a microgravity environment. The satellite rotates at different speeds around its longitudinal axis to simulate environments such as Mars or the Moon, and hence will produce different amounts of gravity over the course of its 12-month mission.

  • Spaceliner

    SpaceLiner in flight

    The DLR SpaceLiner is intended to stand upright like a space shuttle before launch and take off on its journey using rocket engines. After the initial burn, the reusable booster stage will separate from the orbiter, in which there will be a capsule with a capacity of 50 passengers. The glide phase will start eight minutes later, at 20 times the speed of sound.

  • DEX%2dHand: weltraumqualifizierbare Mehrfingerhand

    DEXHand

    The robotic DEXHand brings together two requirements that are important in aerospace technology; it is extremely compact and lightweight, but can withstand the harsh conditions of space with its extreme temperatures, vacuum and exposure to radiation and shock loads.

  • Die Tandem%2dL%2dSatelliten mit großen entfaltbaren Reflektorantennen im Formationsflug

    Tandem-L

    Acquiring high-resolution images of Earth's entire landmass twice a week will be among the capabilities of the radar satellites on a future Tandem-L mission. In this way, Tandem-L would provide the opportunity to capture the dynamic behaviour of Earth in 3D and almost in real time.

  • Rotorblätter werden intelligent

    Rotor blades get smart

    Rotor blade trailing edges with the ability to change their shape and slats that divert wind when required – very large rotor blades equipped with such mechanisms can systematically adapt to gusts and reduce performance fluctuations. As a result susceptibility to damage can be reduced and longer service life achieved.

  • Gläserne Brennkammer

    Looking into a combustion chamber

    What happens inside the combustion chamber of a large gas turbine or aircraft engine? The exhibit permits a look inside and shows how DLR researchers use optical measurement technology and computer simulations to make combustion more efficient and produce fewer pollutants.

The German Aerospace Center (DLR) will showcase a broad range of topics from its research into aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security at the ILA Berlin Air Show from 20 to 25 May 2014. The stand is located in the 'Space & Aeronautic World' in Hall 4.

Exhibits from the field of aviation

  • LamAiR: positive effects of negative sweep
    Aircraft need to achieve a 50 percent increase in fuel efficiency by 2020. As part of the LAMAiR project, DLR has developed a passenger aircraft configuration with swept-forward wings that can help to achieve this goal.

  • Monitoring vibration in aircraft
    It is necessary to examine the vibration stability of new and modified aircraft. DLR has developed a real-time system for vibration monitoring that ensures greater efficiency and safety during flight trials. The demonstrator shows how this technology has progressed.

  • Active panelling – noise supression and music from the cabin walls of aircraft
    In future, the panelling of aircraft cabins will act as a multifunctional structure. DLR has developed an active lining that can be used not merely for passenger announcements and to play music, but can also be operated as a system to suppress noise.

  • Laminar flow upper wing cover made of CFRP
    The wings offer particularly strong potential for further cuts in aviation fuel consumption when extremely smooth and uninterrupted surfaces enable flow without producing turbulence (referred to as laminar flow). DLR has joined with industrial partners to develop a fibre-reinforced composite upper wing cover for this purpose.

  • Autogyro simulator for the Air Vehicle Simulator (AVES)
    DLR was responsible for developing the training simulator for the autogyro MTOsport manufactured by AutoGyro GmbH, and also tested it during training operations. Its purpose is to improve the standards of training. It is part of the DLR AVES Air Vehicle Simulator in Braunschweig.

  • Flexible approaches with the GBAS landing system
    The satellite-supported Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS) enables steep approach routes that may help substantially reduce aircraft noise. Visitors to the show have the opportunity to use a joystick and test steep landing approaches on the demonstrator.

  • Air transport of the future – Blended Wing Body
    For the future of air transport, DLR has investigated how a blended wing body (BWB) aircraft, with its significantly different configuration, compares with conventional aircraft for integration within airport operations. In addition to a model, an animation demonstrates the potential that BWB offers for passenger and freight transport.

  • Sound Machine
    DLR has used the Sound Machine to conduct experiments on subjects (people living close to airports); the objective is to improve the characteristics of aircraft noise. Visitors to the show are invited to try out a touchpad to produce and vary a selection of the elements that make up aircraft noise.

  • Manufacturing with laser metal-melting technology – 3D turbine blades
    Titanium aluminide exhibits excellent strength and stiffness properties while having a low density and can replace alloys with a much higher density in turbines. DLR has developed a manufacturing process for 3D turbine blades that employs laser melting technology. Titanium aluminide could also be used in the compressor stages of turbine engines.

  • Localising defects in structural components used in aviation – 'sensitive'
    Currently, structural components made of fibre-reinforced polymers (FRP) are mainly manufactured using manual production processes. DLR is working on a partial automation of the manufacturing process and has teamed up with KUKA-Roboter GmbH and Profactor GmbH to develop a miniature robot demonstrator with a fibre angle sensor.

  • New methods for 3D terrain models from the air – Modular Airborne Camera Systems
    Detailed, rapidly available elevation models are of great importance for civil protection. 3D cameras on aircraft can make an important contribution. DLR has developed a family of cameras known as MACS (Modular Airborne Camera Systems). Two versions of the camera system are on display at the DLR stand – MACS-Himalaya, designed for extremely difficult terrain and high altitudes, and the MACS-Jet, designed for aircraft flying at speeds of up to 750 kilometres per hour.

  • Demonstration of high-temperature thermal protective layers for durable turbine blades
    Thermal barrier coatings applied to engine turbine blades, which are subject to extreme thermo-mechanical loads, can make the engines more efficient, consume less fuel and produce lower quantities of pollutant emissions. The demonstrator shows the difference in thermal insulation that a white ceramic and a bright metal specimen reveal when exposed to the same heating.

Exhibits from the field of aerospace

  • Eu:CROPIS – satellite greenhouses
    In 2016, the satellite Eu:CROPIS will transport two small 'greenhouses' contained in a pressure vessel into a microgravity environment. The satellite rotates at different speeds around its longitudinal axis to simulate environments such as Mars or the Moon, and hence will produce different amounts of gravity over the course of its 12-month mission.

  • GALANT – test system for uninterrupted signal reception
    The GALANT receiver and antenna array have been developed in order to test and demonstrate new procedures for beam shaping and signal processing. This demonstrator receives GPS and also Galileo signals.

  • Docking training
    Visitors to the show can use two joysticks to try their hand at docking manoeuvres with the International Space Station.

  • EML – melting metal on the ISS in a microgravity environment
    Specimens are positioned floating freely and then melted in the electromagnetic levitator (EML) – without touching the crucible wall, which could otherwise contaminate the material. This new insight will be used to optimise industrial casting processes and to improve the material properties.

  • Black Engine
    DLR is developing rocket combustion chambers made of ultra-high temperature resistant ceramic matrix composite (CMC) and lightweight carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) under the name Black Engine.

  • Steam generator
    A future test rig at the DLR site in Lampoldshausen is intended for testing the upper stage propulsion system of the Ariane 5ME. A steam generator rapidly creates a vacuum to provide a realistic simulation of conditions found at the limits of Earth's atmosphere. Initial tests will be conducted from 2016, permitting the new Ariane 5 ME launcher to lift off with a redesigned upper stage propulsion system from 2017.

  • DEXHand
    The robotic DEXHand brings together two requirements that are important in aerospace technology; it is extremely compact and lightweight, but can withstand the harsh conditions of space with its extreme temperatures, vacuum and exposure to radiation and shock loads.

  • SpaceLiner
    Like the Space Shuttle, DLR's SpaceLiner SpaceLiner is designed to launch from a vertical position and then to use its rocket engines to accelerate along a flight path into the outer layers of Earth's atmosphere. Carrying 50 passengers on board, the orbiter would then transition into glide mode, initially at 20 times the speed of sound.

  • Tandem-L
    Acquiring high-resolution images of Earth's entire landmass twice a week will be among the capabilities of the radar satellites on a future Tandem-L mission. In this way, Tandem-L would provide the opportunity to capture the dynamic behaviour of Earth in 3D and almost in real time.

  • Antenna hub
    DLR's GfR offers the service of setting up antenna systems, installed and tested to meet the conditions that customers require.

  • DVCS
    DLR's GfR has developed its own Voice-over-IP system that is particularly suitable for satellite control centres and similar facilities. It is highly robust and has an intuitive operating concept. It is used in the Galileo control centres and in the German Space Operations Center, GSOC, among other things.

  • 'ADS-B over satellite' – aircraft geolocation from space
    Located at a height of 820 kilometres on board the Proba-V satellite, a DLR receiver and a special antenna pick up the ADS-B signals (Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast) from aircraft. Researchers are using this system to, for the first time, test whether it is possible to provide continuous monitoring of air routes.

Exhibits from the field of technology marketing

  • DLR simulated birds – realistic simulation of accidents involving aircraft and wildlife
    DLR is working on an improved simulated animal that produces similar impact damage to that caused by a real bird. To do this, scientists are analysing each individual step, from production of the artificial bird to the correct firing technique. The aim is to develop a test method using simulated birds for use in the licensing of aeronautical structures.

  • From aerospace to aviation – high-performance ceramic composite brakes aircraft propellers
    When maintaining propeller aircraft engines, the propellers need to remain stationary, and they must also decelerate quickly after landing. The aviation supplier UMBRA Cuscinetti S.p.A. has developed a braking system to fulfil these requirements. DLR is contributing the high-performance ceramic composite used for the braking elements.

  • Active Listening Assistant for controllers (AcListant®)
    In the AcListant® project, DLR has cooperated with Saarland University to add voice recognition to a controller assistance system. In this way, the assistance system not only knows when the controller deviates from the intended flight plan, but also what alternative the controller is pursuing. Visitors to the show can try out the voice recognition system.

  • Ground-supported navigation system for air traffic
    A ground-based emergency system must exist to guarantee safe flight operations when a satellite navigation system is not available. To do this, DLR has developed an innovative concept in which the aircraft navigate using a signal from the future aviation communications system LDACS1.

  • Forecasting thunderstorms at short notice
    Providing reliable forecasts of thunderstorms is of tremendous importance in the aviation sector. DLR has developed a method to detect thunderstorms in real time and up to one hour in advance, based on satellite and radar data.

Exhibits from the field of energy

  • Intelligent rotor blades and new structures
    This exhibit presents a section of the wind turbine rotor blade at a scale of 1:2. Stiffening elements (T-Stringers) render the rotor blade lighter while maintaining the same stability. Flaps on the trailing edges transform the rotor blade into a smart blade, capable of adapting to the wind flow.

  • Looking into a combustion chamber
    What happens inside the combustion chamber of a large gas turbine or aircraft engine? The exhibit permits a look inside and shows how DLR researchers use optical measurement technology and computer simulations to make combustion more efficient and produce fewer pollutants.

  • Kerosene from solar energy –SOLAR-JET
    Within the project SOLAR-JET, ETH Zürich, Bauhaus Luftfahrt, Shell Global Solutions, ARTTIC and DLR are demonstrating a method with which, for the first time, aircraft fuel can be produced directly using sunlight, water and carbon dioxide. The solar reactor developed by ETH-Zürich is on show.

 

Last modified:
20/05/2014 21:17:19