Research Aircraft
ILA Berlin Air Show 2016
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Static display - A close look at DLR research aircraft

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  • DLR research aircraft ATRA
    DLR research aircraft ATRA

    The Airbus A320-232 "D-ATRA", the latest - and largest - addition to the fleet, was deployed by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) in late 2008. ATRA (Advanced Technology Research Aircraft) is a modern and flexible flight test platform which sets a new benchmark for flying test beds in European aerospace research - and not just because of its size.

  • BO 105 zur Vermessung von Erprobung von Avionik%2dSystemen
    BO 105 - for measuring and testing avionics systems

    The tasks for which the BO 105 helicopter is deployed include testing and measuring avionics systems and analysing helicopter properties.

  • Cessna 208B Grand Caravan im Flug
    Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in flight

    The smallest aircraft of DLR's Oberpfaffenhofen flight facility is a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, registration D-FDLR. The single-engine turboprop aircraft is mainly used by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for remote sensing. It is especially well suited for camera flights, such as those with the HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), operated by DLR and also used in space missions.

  • DLR measurement glider

    The new measurement glider Discus-2C DLR (top) with its predecessor, the DG 300 17, during comparative flight.

  • Höhenforschung mit HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft)
    DLR HALO research aircraft

    The HALO high-altitude research aircraft (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft): starting in late 2008, this modified business jet, a Gulfstream G 550, will join the DLR aircraft fleet in data-gathering flights around the globe.

  • A310 ZERO%2dG
    A310 ZERO-G

    Using the Airbus A310 ZERO-G, scientific parabolic flights are carried out for research in microgravity. In June 2014, the Airbus was converted from a VIP plane to a research aircraft, and was purchased by French company Novespace, which is based at Bordeaux-Mérignac. Since March 2015, the metropolis' airport in south-western France has also been home to the A310 ZERO-G.

  • Lilienthal im Flug 1894
    Lilienthal in flight during 1894

    The image shows Otto Lilienthal flying from the Fliegeberg near Berlin. He constructed it specifically for launching gliders; it is thus one of the first artificial airfields. Ottomar Anschütz, a pioneer in photography, took the photograph.

DLR is presenting several aircraft from its research fleet on the open air display area at ILA 2016.

The Airbus A320-232 “D-ATRA" is the largest aircraft in the DLR research fleet and has been deployed since the end of 2008. The ATRA (Advanced Technology Research Aircraft) is a modern, flexible flight research platform which sets new standards in this area of European aviation research, and not only on account of its size.

The Eurocopter BO 105 is a five-seater based on a light, multi-purpose helicopter, the Messerschmitt-Bölkow Blohm GmbH (MBB) and has been extensively modified for its role as a universal research plat-form. Its uses include research into flight characteristics, low-noise ap-proach flight, thermal imaging, pilot assistance systems and flight with externally attached loads.

The Cessna 208B Grand Caravan is a single-engined turboprop aircraft that was converted in 2006 into a “flying classroom“. It has been equipped with an under-wing meteorological measurement system that is able to operate under turbulent conditions. The Cessna also provides space for seven aerospace students to carry out measurements. The “Flying Classroom" project enables students to experience a variety of in-flight experiments and they can also follow the various airborne ma-noeuvres and readings with the use of virtual cockpit instruments on the monitors. There are plans for another research aircraft to stop over at the ILA in order to present some of the climate research work that is being carried out.

The Discus-2c DLR heralds the start of a new generation of research gliders in almost every respect, coming in gradually to replace the reference glider DG 300 17. Its structural design demonstrates progress; while the DG is made of glass-reinforced plastic (GRP), the Discus is constructed using the current industry standard, carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP).

The HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) research aircraft is based on a Gulfstream G 550 ultra-long range business jet. The combination of range, cruising altitude, payload and comprehensive instrumentation make the aircraft a globally unique research platform.

The Airbus A310 ZERO-G parabolic flight aircraft

Using the Airbus A310 ZERO-G, scientific parabolic flights are carried out for research in microgravity. Biologists, doctors, sports scientists, physicists and engineers conduct experiments on board, preparing their research projects for further investigation, for example on the International Space Station ISS, as well as test devices for use in space. Astronauts train in handling the experimental equipment.

In June 2014, the Airbus was converted from a VIP plane to a research aircraft, and was purchased by French company Novespace, which is based at Bordeaux-Mérignac. Since March 2015, the metropolis' airport in south-western France has also been home to the A310 ZERO-G.

Replica of the Lilienthal glider

DLR has built a faithful replica of the world’s first series-produced aircraft and tested it in a wind tunnel. The 'Normalsegelapparat' - or conventional glider - will be presented to the general public for the first time at ILA. The replica is intended to commemorate the work of the aviation pioneer Otto Lilienthal, who became the first human being to take to the air in a flying machine 125 years ago. The DLR Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology in Göttingen conducted the scientific analyses.

The replica was built by the Otto Lilienthal Museum in Anklam, drawing on Lilienthal’s original engineering sketches. Lilienthal gliders have frequently been reconstructed, but this is the first time that a historically accurate replica has been built. A series of preliminary analyses and research work was conducted for this purpose.

Projekt Lilienthal-Gleiter

Last modified:
26/05/2016 10:43:11