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Out of this World
Exhibition "Out of this World"

With 950,000 visitors, 'Out of this world' is most successful exhibition of the Ruhr.2010 project


The exhibition 'Out of this World – Wonders of the Solar System' will end on 30 December 2010. It has been the most successful exhibition held at the Gasometer in Oberhausen by far. The exhibition was opened on 2 April 2009 to mark the International Year of Astronomy. With roughly 430,000 visitors, it soon proved to be its most successful individual effort. Continued as an official RUHR.2010 project, the exhibition received more than 500,000 visitors during that year and became the culture capital project’s most successful exhibition.
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Dave Scott on the moon

A piece of the Moon in Oberhausen


It takes some imagination - the new exhibit on display at the 'Out of this World' exhibition at the Gasometer Oberhausen does not look very spectacular at first glance. Lent to the German Aerospace Center (DLR) by NASA, it is grey in colour and small - weighing just 92.5 grams – but this piece of rock is no lightweight in its significance and value. It originates from another celestial body and is therefore priceless.
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Views of the world under the Moon - A tour through the exhibition 'Out of this World - Wonders of the Solar System'


More than 425,000 people visited 'Out of this World' in its first eight months: a record for the Gasometer. For this reason, the exhibition, presented by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) and the Gasometer Oberhausen GmbH, has been extended beyond the International Year of Astronomy 2009. It will be open for the whole of 2010.
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Mond-Skulptur

Exhibition 'Out of this World - Wonders of the Solar System' extended until end of 2010


The exhibition 'Out of this World - Wonders of the Solar System', presented by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) and Gasometer Oberhausen GmbH, has been extended until 30 December 2010. More than 300,000 visitors have so far experienced the wonders on show. Following the enormous success of the exhibition, it has been named as a project of RUHR.2010, the European Capital of Culture 2010.
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Out of this World

The exhibition 'Out of this World - Wonders of the Solar System' opens in the Oberhausen Gasometer


From Thursday, 2 April 2009 the new exhibition 'Out of this World - Wonders of the Solar System' will be open to visitors at the Oberhausen Gasometer. It shows our Solar System as a huge process of growth and decay and takes visitors on a journey into the cosmos. Spectacular reproductions of our planetary system, fascinating images of alien worlds, precious historical instruments and modern space research technology all form part of this multifaceted exhibition. The 'largest moon on Earth' can be seen under the Gasometer's 100-metre high roof.
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Mond-Skulptur

The largest Moon on Earth


The 'largest Moon on Earth', with a diameter of 25 metres, floats inside the 100-metre high free space that is the Oberhausen Gasometer's 'main ring'. In virtually total darkness, the scene is set for this simulated satellite of the Earth using elaborate lighting. Visitors to the exhibition are able to observe the simulated Moon in all its phases. This picture gallery shows how the sculpture of the Moon was produced and installed.
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Sonne

Wonders of the Solar System: exhibition pictures


The exhibition 'Out of this World' begins with an expansive scene of the Sun and the planets. Large pictures make the dramatic development and amazing diversity of the Universe stunningly apparent.
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Rosetta-Philae

Exhibits from 'Out of this World'


On the gas-pressure disc of the gasometer there are cultural relics, historical telescopes, measuring instruments, astronomical charts and old globes – and beside them the modern instruments of space research. Here it becomes clear how findings concerning cosmic happenings always made progress when new observation technologies revolutionised our gaze into the depths of the cosmos. Among other things, the exhibits include a few small grams of real Moon dust. The Soviet probe Luna 24 brought them back to Earth in 1976. Also on show is a Hasselblad camera with Zeiss lenses, as used by the Apollo astronauts on their trips to the Moon. The model shown was never on the Moon but is, however, an original backup camera.
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