Out of the Classroom - into the Lab!

The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is one of Europe's largest and most modern research institutions. Here is where the aircraft of the future are being developed and pilots trained, rocket engines tested and images of distant planets analyzed. In addition, ca. 8,000 DLR staff members are investigating next-generation high-speed trains, environmentally responsible methods of generating energy, and much more ...

 

 Collapsed slope on Mars. The difference in altitude between the valley floor and the plateau is over 9,000 meters. The image was recorded with a special camera developed at DLR Berlin and installed on the Mars Express probe.
zum Bild Collapsed slope on Mars. The difference in altitude between the valley floor and the plateau is over 9,000 meters. The image was recorded with a special camera developed at DLR Berlin and installed on the Mars Express probe.

One main area of activity at DLR in Berlin is investigating our solar system and developing the optical instruments necessary to do this. Learning about the formation of planets like Mars and other heavenly bodies and how they change over time help us to better understand the evolution of our own planet Earth.

Another major field of interest in Berlin is transportation research. Solving everyday problems like how to avoid traffic jams helps to assure that people and goods keep moving, also in the future.

At the DLR_School_Lab students are introduced in a manner suitable for their age level to topics which are under active investigation at DLR in Berlin, such as planetary research, optical information systems and transportation research. Under the expert guidance of experienced tutors, students can become researchers by conducting on their own fascinating experiments related to current research topics.

 

 DLR measurement span installed on Ernst-Ruska-Ufer in Berlin-Adlershof for traffic research.
zum Bild DLR measurement span installed on Ernst-Ruska-Ufer in Berlin-Adlershof for traffic research.

These include experiments under microgravity conditions, or using infrared radiation, or creating images with a three-dimensional effect - using exactly the same principle behind the stereo camera developed in Berlin and which has for years been transmitting brilliant 3D images of the surface of Mars. Other experiments reveal how navigation systems function, show how traffic light phases on busy intersections can be safely manipulated, or examine alternative energy sources.

All these experiments are designed to stimulate the interest of young people in natural sciences and technology. We do this by making available our know-how and experiments, some of which are quite complex and not easily possible to carry out in the classroom.

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