Advanced search

Filter by
Search in:

Search in: Media

Search in: Multimedia

Search in: Publications

  • Two interacting galaxy clusters, A3391 and A3395

    Two interacting galaxy clusters, A3391 and A3395

    Credit: T. Reiprich (Univ. Bonn), M. Ramos-Ceja (MPE), F. Pacaud (Univ. Bonn), D. Eckert (Univ. Geneva), J. Sanders (MPE), N. Ota (Univ. Bonn), E. Bulbul (MPE), V. Ghirardini (MPE), MPE/IKI  |  Download
    These eROSITA images show the two interacting galaxy clusters A3391, towards the top of the images, and the bimodal cluster A3395, towards the bottom, highlighting eROSITA’s excellent view of the distant Universe. They were observed in a series of image acquisitions performed between 17 and 18 October 2019, using all seven eROSITA telescope modules. The individual images were subjected to different analysis techniques, and then coloured in different schemes to highlight the various structures. In the right-hand image, the red, green and blue colours show the three different energy bands observed by eROSITA. The two clusters can clearly be seen as nebulous structures, which emit brightly in the X-ray spectrum due to the presence of extremely hot gas (millions of degrees) in the space between their component galaxies. The image on the left highlights the ‘bridge’ or ‘filament’ between the two clusters, confirming the suspicion that these two huge structures are interacting dynamically. The eROSITA observations also show hundreds of point-like sources, revealing either distant supermassive black holes or hot stars in the Milky Way.
  • Large Magellanic Cloud observed with eROSITA telescope modules

    Large Magellanic Cloud observed with eROSITA telescope modules

    Credit: F.Haberl, M. Freyberg and C. Maitra, MPE/IKI  |  Download
    This image shows a neighbouring galaxy of the Solar System, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). It was observed during series of image acquisitions performed between 17 and 20 October 2019, using all seven eROSITA telescope modules. The diffuse emission originates from the hot gas between the stars. The nebulous structures in the image are mainly supernova remnants – stellar atmospheres expelled in huge explosions at the end of a massive stars’ lifetime. The most prominent one, SN1987A, can be seen close to the centre of the image as an almost circular, bluish cloud. Large numbers of other sources in the LMC itself include accreting binary stars or stellar clusters with very massive young stars (up to 100 solar masses and more). There are also a number of point sources, which are either foreground stars in the Milky Way or distant active galactic nuclei.
  • Flashlamp based Automated Fiber Placement (FAFP)

    Flashlamp based Automated Fiber Placement (FAFP)

    Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)  |  Download
    Flashlamp based Automated Fiber Placement (FAFP) at DLR Center for Lightweight-Production-Technology (ZLP) in Augsburg.
  • Still video: Fast data transfer - Laser communication for Europe’s space data highway

    Still video: Fast data transfer

    Credit: DLR
    Still video: Fast data transfer - Laser communication for Europe’s space data highway.
  • International Astronautical Congress 2019

    International Astronautical Congress 2019

    Credit: International Astronautical Federation (IAF)  |  Download
    On 21 October 2019, the 70th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) is opening its doors in Washington D.C., with the slogan ‘Space: The Power of the Past, the Promise of the Future’.
  • Artist's impression of Solar Orbiter in front of the glowing sun

    Artist's impression of Solar Orbiter in front of the glowing sun

    Credit: Spacecraft:ESA/ATG medialab; Sun; NASA/SDO/P.Testa (CfA)  |  Download
    ESA's Solar Orbiter spacecraft is scheduled for launch from NASA's Cape Canaveral, Florida, on 5 February 2020, beginning its journey to the centre of the Solar System. Four German research institutes are involved in the mission. The DLR Space Administration financed the development and construction of the German scientific instruments and contribution to the Solar Orbiter spacecraft, with funds from the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.
Use of cookies

OK

Main menu