Programme and Stragegy: Transport research at DLR

The Next Generation Train
The Next Generation Train
Image 1/8, Credit: DLR.

The Next Generation Train

In the Next Generation Train (NGT) project, DLR personnel from nine research institutes are investigating the general conditions for the high-speed trains of the future. This includes, in particular, scientific questions relating to high-speed rail transport in the fields of aerodynamics, structural dynamics, the dynamics of vehicle movement, propulsion, energy management, materials science and lightweight construction. The goal is the development of high-speed trains suitable for type approval and with greatly reduced specific energy requirements as well as improved passenger comfort and noise characteristics.

The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure
The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure
Image 2/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure

In a driving demonstration, the DLR Institute of Transportation Systems, an autonomous vehicle was able take advantage of traffic information, from traffic lights to speed adjustment.

In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights
In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights
Image 3/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights

Innovative communications and positioning technologies make it possible – cars and transport infrastructure exchange information.

More security for the traffic of tomorrow
Image 4/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

More security for the traffic of tomorrow

In the framework of the PEGASUS project, DLR, together with partners from industry and research institutions, is developing concepts for autonomous car transport. This project will make good use of the transport and test infrastructure of the Application Platform for Intelligent Mobility (AIM) in Braunschweig. In 2017 AIM will be expanded with a test field for main and interstate roads in Lower Saxony.

Highly automated: One the touch of a button is enough
Highly automated: One the touch of a button is enough
Image 5/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Highly automated: One the touch of a button is enough

With the touch of a button, the driver can select the level of automation. Road traffic accidents are often the result of errors made by inattentive, overstressed or tired drivers. The objective of the EU project HAVEit (Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport), in which the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) played an active role, was to minimise the number of this kind of accidents. 

The cargo bike in action
Cargo bike
Image 6/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Cargo bike

Despite their large potential to reduce emissions and increase transport efficiency, cargo bikes have thus far not been used to any significant extent for commercial purposes.This project offers companies and public institutions the opportunity to test cargo bikes over long periods of time. In addition, a large number of other decision-makers and multipliers will be addressed through intensive public relations work.

Technology for the test field Lower Saxony
Technology for the test field Lower Saxony
Image 7/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Technology for the test field Lower Saxony

Technology, which is already installed at the AIM research junction, is also installed and used within the framework of the test field in Lower Saxony.

The low-speed wind tunnel at Braunschweig
The low-speed wind tunnel at Braunschweig
Image 8/8, Credit: DNW.

The low-speed wind tunnel at Braunschweig

On 2 December 2010, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) opened the world's most powerful aero-acoustic wind tunnel in collaboration with German-Dutch Wind Tunnels (Deutsch-Niederländische Windkanäle; DNW). Scientists use wind tunnels to investigate the aero-acoustic properties of objects such as aircraft engines and wings. Not only is the Braunschweig wind tunnel one of the most powerful of its kind, but also it is so versatile that it can be used for cars as well as planes. This presents new possibilities in which to record and reduce sources of noise pollution.

Research that moves

How will society move from point A to point B in the future? How can we possibly have a world without accidents, traffic jams, delays and detours? How can we bring our mobility into harmony with mother nature? And how might an environmentally friendly traffic system of the future that supports a growing economy look? We need substantive answers that will bring concrete solutions for our increasingly mobile society and globalized economy.

The path to a future-oriented traffic system

German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is with its Transport Programme Europe’s second largest institutionally funded transport research center. Tomorrow’s mobility challenges are identified here and provided with jointly developed solutions. These solutions contribute to a future-oriented traffic system from which both the general public and industry in Germany and Europe profit in equal measure.

Seven research topics are currently in focus:

  • Road vehicles
  • Rail vehicles
  • Traffic management
  • Transport and the environment
  • Urban mobility
  • Electromobility
  • Traffic management at public mass events and disasters

Fewer accidents, traffic jams, delays, detours und reduced environmental pollution are the overriding goals of our research.

Concerted traffic research at DLR

The research projects are fundamentally interdisciplinary and follow a systemic approach. Traffic research greatly benefits from this fact, especially since 25 DLR research institutes spanning areas such as energy, transport, aerospace and space research all participate in the research effort. Not only are interdisciplinary synergies created as a result, exciting scientific exchanges take place since each and every project is approached from various perspectives. The use of large DLR research facilities including wind tunnels, crashing units and simulators all contribute towards finding innovative solutions.

The traffic research program is based on an excellent network existing amongst the research landscape. In the same manner, DLR also has excellent relationships with its European counterparts such as IFSTTAR in France, AIT in Austria and TNO in the Netherlands. Active information exchanges are also carried out with other German organisations such as KIT, BASt and the Fraunhofer Institute.

Excellent relations are cultivated with Institutes of higher learning as well as with universities and different industrial sectors, all with the aim to promote research within any given project.

DLR’s communication with all relevant ministries at the federal and state levels guarantees an optimal coordination of different research programs with politics.

Read more about the topics that drive us, also about the projects that we are driving (GER)

Contact
  • Dipl.-Ing. Magnus Lamp
    Program Management Transport
    German Aerospace Center (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-3630
    Fax: +49 2203 601-4712
    Linder Höhe
    51147  Köln
    Contact
  • Dr. Detlef Zukunft
    Programme Coordinator Transport
    German Aerospace Center (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-3030
    Fax: +49 2203 601-4712
    Linder Höhe
    51147  Köln
    Contact
  • Dipl.-Ing. Jean-Marc Pfeiffer
    Program Coordinator Transport
    German Aerospace Center (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203-601-3470
    Linder Höhe
    51147  Köln
    Contact
  • Simon Neuenhöfer
    Programme Coordinator Transport
    German Aerospace Center (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-3610
    Fax: +49 2203 601-4712
    Linder Höhe
    51147  Köln
    Contact
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