In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights
In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights
Image 1/5, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

In ‘conversation’ with the traffic lights

Innovative communications and positioning technologies make it possible – cars and transport infrastructure exchange information.

More security for the traffic of tomorrow
Image 2/5, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

More security for the traffic of tomorrow

In the framework of the PEGASUS project, DLR, together with partners from industry and research institutions, is developing concepts for autonomous car transport. This project will make good use of the transport and test infrastructure of the Application Platform for Intelligent Mobility (AIM) in Braunschweig. In 2017 AIM will be expanded with a test field for main and interstate roads in Lower Saxony.

The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure
The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure
Image 3/5, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

The car of the future communicates with traffic infrastructure

In a driving demonstration, the DLR Institute of Transportation Systems, an autonomous vehicle was able take advantage of traffic information, from traffic lights to speed adjustment.

Highly automated: One touch of a button is enough
Highly automated: One touch of a button is enough
Image 4/5, Credit: HAVEit.

Highly automated: One touch of a button is enough

With the touch of a button, the driver can select the level of automation. Road traffic accidents are often the result of errors made by inattentive, overstressed or tired drivers. The objective of the EU project HAVEit (Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport), in which the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) played an active role, was to minimise the number of this kind of accidents.

Automated freight ground transport
Image 5/5, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0).

Automated freight ground transport

Within the scope of the ATLaS project, investigations are being carried out into how the logistics industry can become more efficient and service oriented through automation and networking.

Mobility is a central feature of developed societies. The transportation of people and goods not only generates social participation and added value but also causes negative effects that need to be minimised. For this reason, DLR is researching the interrelationships between the development of transport and its impact in their different dimensions. This includes the analysis of user preferences and behaviour, the development of transport supply and demand, and the environmental impact of noise emissions, greenhouse gases and air pollutants. 

In this process, DLR pays particular attention to developments in urban areas and to the interplay between different transport modes, including pedestrian and bicycle traffic. However, its research also focuses on the increasing automation and digitalisation of the transport system – along with the associated opportunities and risks – as well as the fundamental linking of the energy and transport systems for the development of sustainable mobility.

For the targeted development of intermodal transport, the efficient design of transfer processes and transhipment operations is a significant factor to which DLR is devoting increasing attention in its study of transport hubs, such as railway stations and seaports. For the economic evaluation of new technologies and political measures, along with their implications for transport, DLR is developing economic models and methods so that it can present the costs and benefits in a differentiated and reliable way.

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