The Eu­ro­pean space lab­o­ra­to­ry Colum­bus

Exterior view of the European Columbus laboratory

Ex­te­ri­or view of the Eu­ro­pean Colum­bus lab­o­ra­to­ry

Columbus is a research laboratory that offers 25 cubic metres of space to as many as three astronauts working on scientific experiments.


Download
Image 1/20, Credit: EADS
The large training-pool at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

The large train­ing-pool at the Neu­tral Buoy­an­cy Lab­o­ra­to­ry (NBL)

The large training-pool at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) – length: 62 metres, width: 31 metres, depth: 12 meter, capacity: 22.7 million litres.


Download
Image 2/20, Credit: NASA
Artist's impression of the Columbus laboratory

Artist's im­pres­sion of the Colum­bus lab­o­ra­to­ry

The Columbus laboratory is ESA's biggest contribution to the International Space Station (ISS). Delivered to ESA by EADS SPACE Transportation on 2 May 2006, this laboratory will provide internal payload accommodation for various scientific experiments. The Columbus laboratory is due to be flown on Space Shuttle Atlantis to the ISS in December 2007.


Download
Image 3/20, Credit: ESA
STS-122 astronauts (kneeling) and support team with the European Columbus laboratory

STS-122 as­tro­nauts (kneel­ing) and sup­port team with the Eu­ro­pean Colum­bus lab­o­ra­to­ry

STS-122 astronauts (kneeling) and support team with the European Columbus laboratory inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Columbus is under preparation in the SSPF for launch into orbit with Space Shuttle Atlantis on flight STS-122.


Download
Image 4/20, Credit: ESA
ESA astronauts Léopold Eyharts (left) and Hans Schlegel (right) in front of the Columbus laboratory

ESA as­tro­nauts Léopold Ey­harts (left) and Hans Schlegel (right) in front of the Colum­bus lab­o­ra­to­ry

ESA astronauts Léopold Eyharts (left) and Hans Schlegel (right) in front of the Columbus laboratory in the NASA integration hall known as the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) at the Kennedy Space Center. Columbus is being prepared for the launch of mission STS-122.


Download
Image 5/20, Credit: ESA
United Space Alliance (USA) suit technicians assisted the crew

Unit­ed Space Al­liance (USA) suit tech­ni­cians as­sist­ed the crew

The STS-122 crewmembers don training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits in preparation for a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center. From the left are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; Alan G. Poindexter, pilot; Leland D. Melvin, Rex J. Walheim, European Space Agency's (ESA) Hans Schlegel and Stanley G. Love, all mission specialists. United Space Alliance (USA) suit technicians assisted the crew.


Download
Image 6/20, Credit: NASA
The STS-122 Crew at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center

The STS-122 Crew at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Cen­ter

The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait at Launch Pad 39A as Atlantis undergoes final preparations for launch behind them. From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; Commander Steve Frick; and Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Léopold Eyharts. Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency. Eyharts remained on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.


Download
Image 7/20, Credit: NASA
Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched on 7 February 2008

Space Shut­tle At­lantis was launched on 7 Febru­ary 2008

Right up to the last moment on 7 February 2008, it was uncertain if the weather conditions in Cape Canaveral in Florida would allow the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis at all. By launch time, at 14:45 (20:45 Central European Time), the clouds dispersed and NASA cleared the shuttle launch for mission STS-122. This mission brought the European research laboratory Columbus to the ISS.


Download
Image 8/20, Credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph, Tony Gray, Robert Murray
View of the Columbus Control Center

View of the Colum­bus Con­trol Cen­ter

View of the Columbus Control Center.


Download
Image 9/20, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)
Space laboratory Columbus en route to its final position

Space lab­o­ra­to­ry Colum­bus en route to its fi­nal po­si­tion

The Columbus research laboratory en route to its new position, the right-side port of the Harmony module (Node 2). The Columbus laboratory was attached to the International Space Station ISS on 11 February 2008.


Download
Image 10/20, Credit: ESA/NASA
NASA astronaut Rex Walheim attaches Columbus to the ISS

NASA as­tro­naut Rex Wal­heim at­tach­es Colum­bus to the ISS

NASA astronaut Rex Walheim during the first activity outside the spacecraft (Extra-vehicular Activity, or EVA for short) of the Columbus mission, on 11 February 2008. Together with his colleague, NASA astronaut Stanley Love, Walheim attached the Columbus space laboratory to the International Space Station ISS.


Download
Image 11/20, Credit: NASA
NASA astronaut Rex Walheim on the ISS robotic arm

NASA as­tro­naut Rex Wal­heim on the ISS robot­ic arm

NASA astronaut Rex Walheim during his second extra-vehicular activity on 13 February 2008. Walheim is suspended from the robotic arm (Canadarm2) of the International Space Station ISS, holding a nitrogen tank. The nitrogen tank, which is the size of a refrigerator, is used in cooling the ISS.


Download
Image 12/20, Credit: NASA
German ESA astronaut Hans Schlegel during the extra-vehicular activity

Ger­man ESA as­tro­naut Hans Schlegel dur­ing the ex­tra-ve­hic­u­lar ac­tiv­i­ty

German ESA astronaut Hans Schlegel climbed out of the International Space Station (ISS) on 13 February 2008. The main objective of his extra-vehicular activity with NASA astronaut Rex Walheim was to replace a refrigerator-sized nitrogen tank that is part of the ISS cooling system. The spacewalk lasted from 15:27 CET to 22:12 – 6 hours and 45 minutes.


Download
Image 13/20, Credit: ESA/NASA
Climbing practice while weightless

Climb­ing prac­tice while weight­less

German ESA astronaut Hans Schlegel performing his extra-vehicular activity during the Columbus mission, on 13 February 2008. The image was recorded while the International Space Station ISS was flying over the night-side of the Earth, almost completely unlit.


Download
Image 14/20, Credit: ESA/NASA
The STS-122 crew and the resident ISS crew

The STS-122 crew and the res­i­dent ISS crew

Group photo of the STS 122 crew together with the resident crew, Expedition 16, on board the International Space Station ISS.


Download
Image 15/20, Credit: ESA/NASA
The European space laboratory Columbus is part of the ISS

The Eu­ro­pean space lab­o­ra­to­ry Colum­bus is part of the ISS

The Columbus laboratory, photographed after the undocking manoeuvre of the Space Shuttle Atlantis from the International Space Station ISS. During the so-called fly-around on 18 February 2008, the shuttle flies around the ISS. The Space Shuttle astronauts have used this opportunity to take pictures of the ISS in its current construction stage. During the STS-122 mission, the Columbus space laboratory was added - it is the horizontal, shiny drum in the image.


Download
Image 16/20, Credit: ESA/NASA
ISS and Columbus module in front of Earth

ISS and Colum­bus mod­ule in front of Earth

The International Space Station (ISS) in orbit above Earth's night side. The illuminated part of the Earth appears in blue on the right-hand side of the image. In the centre of the image, the European Columbus laboratory can be seen as a cylinder; it was installed on the ISS in February 2008.


Download
Image 17/20, Credit: ESA/NASA.
The Columbus laboratory

View of the Colum­bus lab­o­ra­to­ry from the Space Shut­tle At­lantis

The European Columbus laboratory was attached to the ISS during the STS-122 mission. Columbus is a joint European project led by the European Space Agency ESA. Germany was and is prominently involved in building, operating and using Columbus. The Columbus Control Centre is located within the German Space Operations Center (Deutsches Raumfahrt-Kontrollzentrum) in Oberpfaffenhofen.


Download
Image 18/20, Credit: NASA
ESA astronaut Hans Schlegel in front of the Space Shuttle window

ESA as­tro­naut Hans Schlegel in front of the Space Shut­tle win­dow

After undocking from the ISS, the astronauts in the Space Shuttle Atlantis look back through the shuttle window. German ESA astronaut Hans Schlegel, who, along with his colleagues on the STS-122 mission, installed the Columbus space laboratory on the ISS and commissioned it, looks back at the work they have done.


Download
Image 19/20, Credit: NASA
Photo op after the landing

Pho­to op af­ter the land­ing

The astronauts of the STS-122 mission after the landing, in front of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left to right: Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love, Rex Walheim, Alan Poindexter, and Stephen Frick. During its mission, the crew had attached the European space laboratory Columbus to the ISS.


Download
Image 20/20, Credit: NASA

The Columbus laboratory, Europe's key contribution to the International Space Station ISS, is the first European space laboratory designed for ongoing multidisciplinary research in space. It installed on the ISS and put into operation on 11 February 2008.

Media items
More galleries

Cookies help us to provide our services. By using our website you agree that we can use cookies. Read more about our Privacy Policy and visit the following link: Privacy Policy

Main menu