Roset­ta mis­sion

Philae landing on comet

Phi­lae land­ing on comet

January 2, 2014  Artist’s im­pres­sion of the Roset­ta or­biter de­ploy­ing the Phi­lae lan­der to comet 67P/Churyu­mov–Gerasi­menko (not to scale).


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Image 1/23, Credit: ESA–C. Carreau/ATG medialab.
Course of the landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Course of the land­ing on Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko

November 7, 2014  The Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR) Lan­der Con­trol Cen­ter (LCC) is re­spon­si­ble for the op­er­a­tion and com­mand­ing the Phi­lae lan­der.


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Image 2/23, Credit: DLR/ESA
The Philae lander on board the European Rosetta spacecraft

The Phi­lae lan­der on board the Eu­ro­pean Roset­ta space­craft

November 30, 2018  Since its launch in 2004, Roset­ta has been 'pro­tect­ing' the small Phi­lae lan­der from all the harsh con­di­tions en­coun­tered in in­ter­plan­e­tary space. (Frame from 'Chas­ing A Comet – The Roset­ta Mis­sion'.)


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Image 3/23, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)
Philae landing on the comet

Phi­lae land­ing on the comet

February 22, 2011  In 2014, the Phi­lae lan­der on board the Eu­ro­pean Roset­ta space­craft will reach comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko. The goal of this first land­ing on a comet is to learn more about the for­ma­tion of the So­lar Sys­tem.


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Image 4/23, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)
Philae drill

Phi­lae drill

October 14, 2014  Few things could be more fas­ci­nat­ing or de­mand­ing in the his­to­ry of Eu­ro­pean space trav­el than the Roset­ta comet mis­sion. The lan­der, Phi­lae, will sep­a­rate from its par­ent craft on 11 Novem­ber 2014, touch down on the comet and im­me­di­ate­ly fire har­poons to an­chor it­self on the sur­face. The two space­craft will then ac­com­pa­ny the comet on its month-long jour­ney to the point at which it is clos­est to the Sun.


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Image 5/23, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)
Mars, imaged by Rosetta during its 2007 fly-by

Mars, im­aged by Roset­ta dur­ing its 2007 fly-by

February 18, 2014  On 25 Febru­ary 2007, the Roset­ta space­craft flew past Mars on its way to Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko. The im­age shows a glob­al view of Mars. It was ac­quired on 24 Febru­ary 2007 from a dis­tance about 240,000 kilo­me­tres with the nar­row an­gle cam­era of the Op­ti­cal, Spec­tro­scop­ic, and In­frared Re­mote Imag­ing Sys­tem (OSIRIS). It is com­posed of record­ings made us­ing three fil­ters – near in­frared, green and near ul­tra­vi­o­let; the res­o­lu­tion is about five kilo­me­tres per pix­el. A veil of clouds in the at­mo­sphere and the ice cap at the South Pole, which has al­most its largest sea­son­al ex­pan­sion at the on­set of spring in the south­ern hemi­sphere, are clear­ly vis­i­ble.


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Image 6/23, Credit: ESA © 2007 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/ LAM/IAA/ RSSD/ INTA/UPM/ DASP/ IDA
Measuring Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Mea­sur­ing Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko

October 17, 2014  Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko's di­men­sions, as mea­sured from im­ages tak­en by Roset­ta's OSIRIS imag­ing sys­tem. The im­ages shown in the graph­ic were tak­en by Roset­ta's nav­i­ga­tion cam­era on 19 Au­gust. The larg­er lobe of the comet mea­sures 4.1 x 3.2 x 1.3 km, while the small­er lobe is 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.0 km.


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Image 7/23, Credit: Image: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM; Dimensions: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Inhomogeneous surface

In­ho­mo­ge­neous sur­face

January 22, 2015  The sci­en­tists on the OSIRIS (Op­ti­cal, Spec­tro­scop­ic, and In­frared Re­mote Imag­ing Sys­tem) team have di­vid­ed the sur­face of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko in­to 19 dif­fer­ent re­gions.


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Image 8/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.
Comet wide-angle view

Comet wide-an­gle view

January 30, 2015  Wide-an­gle view of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov–Gerasi­menko tak­en by OSIRIS on 12 Septem­ber 2014.


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Image 9/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
An active comet

An ac­tive comet

August 11, 2015  This record­ing of the OSIRIS cam­era shows the spot (marked with a red cir­cle) on Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko, where the mas­sive gas erup­tion oc­curred on 29 Ju­ly 2015.


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Image 10/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Comet on 16 January 2015

Comet on 16 Jan­uary 2015

January 30, 2015  This four-im­age mo­sa­ic com­pris­es Roset­ta nav­i­ga­tion cam­era im­ages tak­en from a dis­tance of 28.4 km from the cen­tre of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko on 16 Jan­uary. The im­age res­o­lu­tion is 2.4 m/pix­el and the in­di­vid­u­al 1024 x 1024 frames mea­sure about 2.5 km across. The mo­sa­ic mea­sures 4.5 x 4.2 km.


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Image 11/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
Comet on 3 February 2015

Comet on 3 Febru­ary 2015

February 10, 2015  This four-im­age mo­sa­ic com­pris­es im­ages tak­en from a dis­tance of 28.7 km from the cen­tre of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko on 3 Febru­ary. The im­age res­o­lu­tion is 2.4 m/pix­el and the in­di­vid­u­al 1024 x 1024 frames mea­sure 2.5 km across. The mo­sa­ic mea­sures 4.2 x 4.6 km.


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Image 12/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
View of Churyumov-Gerasimenko from an altitude of 67.4 metres

View of Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko from an al­ti­tude of 67.4 me­tres

July 30, 2015  This im­age, ac­quired by the RO­LIS cam­era, shows the comet Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko from an al­ti­tude of 67.4 me­tres on 12 Novem­ber 2014. The cam­era, lo­cat­ed on the bot­tom side of the lan­der, was able to pho­to­graph the orig­i­nal­ly planned land­ing site, Ag­ilkia, dur­ing the de­scent. A por­tion of the land­ing gear is seen in the up­per right cor­ner of the im­age. Clear­ly vis­i­ble is the comet's sur­face, ex­hibit­ing un­ex­pect­ed­ly coarse ma­te­ri­al and a five-me­tre tall boul­der. The RO­LIS cam­era is op­er­at­ed un­der the sci­en­tif­ic lead­er­ship of the Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR).


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Image 13/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS/DLR
The Philae landing site

The Phi­lae land­ing site

June 10, 2015  Us­ing mea­sure­ments per­formed by the COmet Nu­cle­us Sound­ing Ex­per­i­ment by Ra­dio wave Trans­mis­sion (CON­SERT) in­stru­ment, the lo­ca­tion of Phi­lae on Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko has been nar­rowed down to an el­lipse of 16 by 160 me­tres (marked in red).


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Image 14/23, Credit: Ellipse: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CONSERT; Image: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Overflight view

Over­flight view

February 26, 2015  On 14 Febru­ary 2015, the Op­ti­cal, Spec­tro­scop­ic, and In­frared Re­mote Imag­ing Sys­tem (OSIRIS) on the Roset­ta space­craft ob­served the sur­face of comet 67P Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko in the Imhotep re­gion with the Sun di­rect­ly be­hind it from an al­ti­tude of six kilo­me­tres. The im­age res­o­lu­tion is 11 cen­time­tres per pix­el. The or­biter’s shad­ow is vis­i­ble as a dark rect­an­gu­lar patch in the low­er part of the im­age.


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Image 15/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
14 February close flyby

14 Febru­ary close fly­by

February 18, 2015  Four-im­age mo­sa­ic of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov–Gerasi­menko com­pris­ing im­ages tak­en on 14 Febru­ary 2015 dur­ing the first ded­i­cat­ed close fly­by. This im­age set was tak­en at 14:15 GMT from a dis­tance of 8.9 km from the sur­face. The im­age scale is 0.76 m/pix­el.


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Image 16/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
Jet streams on Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Jet streams on Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko

February 9, 2015  A promi­nent jet, to­geth­er with gas an dust out­flows are vis­i­ble in this four-im­age mo­sa­ic, cre­at­ed from im­ages ac­quired by Roset­ta's Nav­i­ga­tion Cam­era NAV­CAM on 31 Jan­uary 2015. The comet’s ac­tiv­i­ty will in­crease as it ap­proach­es the Sun. Mod­el cal­cu­la­tions show that the north­ern sec­tion can ex­pect to lose a few me­tres of sur­face through­out the or­bit, while the south­ern part will lose up to 20 me­tres.


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Image 17/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM - CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
A close-up of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

A close-up of 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko

January 22, 2015  This im­age of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko was ac­quired from a dis­tance of just eight kilo­me­tres. The OSIRIS (Op­ti­cal, Spec­tro­scop­ic, and In­frared Re­mote Imag­ing Sys­tem) cam­era im­aged an area lo­cat­ed on the comet’s ‘head’. The res­o­lu­tion is ap­prox­i­mate­ly 15 cen­time­tres per pix­el.


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Image 18/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Imhotep region on Churyumov–Gerasimenko

Imhotep re­gion on Churyu­mov–Gerasi­menko

January 30, 2015  Sur­face tex­tures on the bor­der of the board, smooth re­gion in Imhotep, on the large lobe of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov–Gerasi­menko.


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Image 19/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Comet on 21 January 2015

Comet on 21 Jan­uary 2015

January 30, 2015  This four-im­age mo­sa­ic com­pris­es Roset­ta nav­i­ga­tion cam­era im­ages tak­en from a dis­tance of 27.9 km from the cen­tre of Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko on 21 Jan­uary. The im­age res­o­lu­tion is 2.4 m/pix­el and the in­di­vid­u­al 1024 x 1024 frames mea­sure about 2.4 km across. The mo­sa­ic mea­sures 4.2 x 4 km.


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Image 20/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
Rosetta Mission Logo

Roset­ta Mis­sion Lo­go

January 2, 2014  Roset­ta Mis­sion Lo­go.


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Image 21/23, Credit: ESA
Philae: found!

Phi­lae: found!

September 5, 2016  Short­ly be­fore the end of the mis­sion, the OSIRIS cam­era sys­tem fit­ted to Roset­ta man­aged to lo­cate Phi­lae at its land­ing site on Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko.


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Image 22/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Comet lander Philae on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Comet lan­der Phi­lae on 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko

September 5, 2016  The Roset­ta or­biter has been draw­ing ev­er clos­er to Comet 67P/Churyu­mov-Gerasi­menko. Now the Phi­lae land­ing craft is clear­ly vis­i­ble in the im­age ac­quired by the OSIRIS cam­era sys­tem.


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Image 23/23, Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

In 2014, the Philae lander on board the European Rosetta spacecraft reached comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The goal of this first landing on a comet was to learn more about the formation of the Solar System.

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