In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty

Wing model in the wind tunnel
Wing mod­el in the wind tun­nel
Image 1/3, Credit: DNW-HST

Wing model in the wind tunnel

For air­craft of the fu­ture: The re­al-time flut­ter anal­y­sis was car­ried out in the High-Speed Tun­nel (HST) of the Ger­man-Dutch Wind Tun­nels (DNW) in Am­s­ter­dam in Oc­to­ber 2018.
Vibration tests on the DemoBlade wind turbine rotor blade
Vi­bra­tion tests on the De­moBlade wind tur­bine ro­tor blade
Image 2/3, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Vibration tests on the DemoBlade wind turbine rotor blade

DLR re­searchers use 300 ac­cel­er­a­tion and 200 strain sen­sors to test the sta­bil­i­ty of a ro­tor blade.

The Institute of Aeroelasticity in Göttingen
The In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty in Göt­tin­gen
Image 3/3, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

The Institute of Aeroelasticity in Göttingen

Found­ed in 1957, the for­mer AVA de­part­ment for Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty be­came a sep­a­rate in­sti­tute af­ter in­te­gra­tion of the AVA in­to the DFVLR. It is the on­ly re­search in­sti­tute of the kind in Eu­rope. In the in­sti­tute mul­ti­dis­ci­plinary re­search ac­tiv­i­ties and in­dus­tri­al con­tracts are per­formed with the aim to re­li­ably pre­dict aeroe­las­tic phe­nom­e­na and to en­sure there­fore op­er­a­tional safe­ty of new de­vel­op­ments.

The field of Aeroelastics addresses the physical processes that occur during flow around elastic structures due to the interaction between aerodynamic and elastomechanical forces. Particularly in the case of highly elastic structures and high flow velocities, as is the case with aircraft, this interaction can lead to fluttering and mechanical overload and thus to dangerous consequences. For this reason, the most important task in aeroelastics is to design these structures in a dependable manner by using suitable methods and technologies.

The Institute conducts research in the fields of structural dynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, aeroelastic stability and dynamic loads.

The present day DLR Institute can trace its history back to the AVA Department for Unsteady Processes or the institute of the same name founded in 1939 in Göttingen. It was re-established in 1957 as the Department of Aeroelasticity and, after the AVA became part of DFVLR in 1972, became the Institute of Aeroelasticity.

Contact
  • Prof. Dr.-Ing. Lorenz Tichy
    Head of In­sti­tute
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty
    Telephone: +49 551 709-2341
    Fax: +49 551 709-2862

    Contact
  • Daniela Erdmann
    Man­age­ment Team, Sec­re­tari­ate
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty
    Telephone: +49 551 709-2482

    Contact
Aeroelasticity: why aircraft are elastic
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Aeroelasticity: why aircraft are elastic
The video gets to the bottom of why aircraft wings, although elastic are safe.
Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)
Research
Locations and Offices
Göttingen
Projects
Infrastructure
  • 17,78
    95

    In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty: num­ber of em­ploy­ees (2019)

  • 17,78
    17
    Female
  • 17,78
    78
    Male
  • 66,276
    342

    In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty: num­ber of pub­li­ca­tions – 19 per­cent open ac­cess (2014 to 2018)

  • 66,276
    66
    number of publications of open access between 2014 and 2018
  • 66,276
    276
    number of publications of non-open access between 2014 and 2018
  • Icon Promoting Young Scientists
    23

    In­sti­tute of Aeroe­las­tic­i­ty: num­ber of PhD stu­dents (2018)

  • Icon Promoting Young Scientists
    23
    2018

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