Air Ve­hi­cle Sim­u­la­tor (AVES)

AVES motion simulator
AVES mo­tion sim­u­la­tor
Image 1/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

AVES motion simulator

A clus­ter of more than 60 com­put­ers gen­er­ates im­ages for the 15 high-qual­i­ty LED pro­jec­tors in each of the sim­u­la­tors and con­trols the elec­tri­cal­ly op­er­at­ed move­ment sys­tem with the high­est pre­ci­sion.
Fixed Simulator
Fixed Sim­u­la­tor
Image 2/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Fixed Simulator

The fixed sim­u­la­tor is avail­able for flight sim­u­la­tions that do not re­quire ma­noeu­vres. It has 15 LED pro­jec­tors that pro­vide a field of view of 240 by 95 de­grees.
Aeroplane cockpit simulation
Air­craft sim­u­la­tor flight deck
Image 3/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Aircraft simulator flight deck

The air­craft sim­u­la­tor flight deck is faith­ful­ly mod­elled on that of of an Air­bus A320, but it can be ex­pand­ed in a mod­u­lar way to in­clude ad­di­tion­al dis­play and con­trol el­e­ments.
Helicopter simulator flight deck
He­li­copter sim­u­la­tor flight deck
Image 4/8, Credit: © DLR. All rights reserved

Helicopter simulator flight deck

The he­li­copter sim­u­la­tor flight deck is a re­al­is­tic repli­ca of a Eu­ro­copter EC135. It can be ex­pand­ed in a mod­u­lar way to in­clude ad­di­tion­al dis­play and con­trol el­e­ments.
View of the AVES building
View of the AVES build­ing
Image 5/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

View of the AVES building

View of the AVES mo­tion sim­u­la­tor build­ing in Braun­schweig.
Operator workstation
Op­er­a­tor work­sta­tion
Image 6/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Operator workstation

The op­er­a­tor work­sta­tion at the rear of the EC135-FHS sim­u­la­tion flight deck en­ables ef­fec­tive con­trol of the sim­u­la­tion sce­nar­ios.
Passenger cabin
Pas­sen­ger cab­in
Image 7/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Passenger cabin

The cab­in mod­ule can be used to car­ry out stud­ies on pas­sen­ger com­fort, for ex­am­ple by ex­am­in­ing var­i­ous colour con­cepts for dif­fer­ent am­biances dur­ing the flight.
Aircraft simulator flight deck
Air­craft sim­u­la­tor flight deck
Image 8/8, Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

Aircraft simulator flight deck

The A320-ATRA sim­u­la­tor flight deck has an op­er­a­tor work­sta­tion from which the sim­u­la­tion stud­ies can be mon­i­tored.

The German Aerospace Centre (DLR) Institute of Flight Systems in Braunschweig is home to the Air Vehicle Simulator (AVES) large-scale facility; it consists of two high-quality systems for aircraft and helicopter simulation, as well as a passenger cabin with a virtual exterior view. Researchers use the accurately replicated flight decks of an A320 aircraft and an EC135 helicopter to investigate how pilots cope with new flight technologies. The simulator can also be used to improve pilot training.

Researching how today’s pilots and passengers will fly tomorrow

The large-scale facility is equipped with state-of-the-art research and simulation systems that allow pilots and researchers to observe a 240-degree field of view and experience almost real-world flight conditions. Its impressive projector system, motion platform and adaptability make AVES unique within the global research landscape, allowing pilots and passengers to undertake flights as they would under real-world conditions, without actually taking off.

In addition, the facility can be very easily modified; specific features of different aircraft can be replicated with a high degree of accuracy by quickly adapting the software and changing the flight deck layout. Using software, the dynamic behaviour of the simulated aircraft, all flight deck displays, sounds, vibrations, movements and virtual exterior views can be adjusted based on specific experimental requirements.

Consequently, AVES enables a whole-system approach to exploring the future of flight – it addresses the following questions:

  • How much additional information and technology can today’s airline pilots tolerate?
  • How can aircraft noise be minimised?
  • What are the benefits of active side sticks in a helicopter?
  • How acceptable are completely new control concepts (for example, using a steering wheel)?
  • How easy is it to operate new configurations, such as flying wings or combinations of fixed and rotary wings?
  • How can passenger comfort be further improved and how can the fear of flying be reduced?
Contact
  • Volker Speelmann
    Head of Cen­tral Ex­pen­di­ture Man­age­ment
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-4103
    Fax: +49 2203 601 4115
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact
  • Stefan Levedag
    Di­rec­tor
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Flight Sys­tems
    Telephone: +49 531 295-2600
    Lilienthalplatz 7
    38108 Braunschweig
    Contact

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