Arc-heat­ed wind tun­nel (L2K)

Arc-heated wind tunnel (L2K)
Arc-heat­ed wind tun­nel (L2K)
Image 1/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Arc-heated wind tunnel (L2K)

Mod­el with in­te­grat­ed mag­net­ic coil for in­ves­ti­gat­ing mag­ne­to­hy­drody­man­ic (MHD) ef­fects in ar­gon flow in the L2K.
L2K measuring chamber
L2K mea­sur­ing cham­ber
Image 2/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

L2K measuring chamber

The L2K mea­sur­ing cham­ber with a noz­zle flange, a dif­fus­er in­let, an ad­just­ment de­vice and a test mod­el.
Components of the L2K system
Com­po­nents of the L2K sys­tem
Image 3/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Components of the L2K system

Com­po­nents of the L2K sys­tem – a heat ex­chang­er, a dif­fus­er, a vac­u­um slide and a mea­sur­ing cham­ber.
Material test
Ma­te­ri­al test
Image 4/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Material test

Ma­te­ri­al test for en­try in­to the par­ti­cle-laden Mar­tian at­mo­sphere.
Test model
Test mod­el
Image 5/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Test model

Mod­el for mea­sur­ing stag­na­tion point heat flux­es in L2K.

The arc-heated wind tunnel (L2K) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology in Cologne is used to generate the extreme flow conditions that prevail directly around a spacecraft as it enters an atmosphere.

The atmosphere of Mars or Saturn's moon Titan

DLR's arc-heated wind tunnel (L2K) can simulate the atmospheres of various celestial bodies such as Earth, Mars and Saturn’s moon Titan. For the case of entering the Martian atmosphere, the influence of small dust particles on the mechanical and thermal properties of high-temperature materials can also be investigated.

High-temperature materials used as thermal shields for spacecraft and missiles can be characterised and qualified under realistic conditions in a variety of atmosphere conditions using the arc-heated wind tunnel. Moreover, L2K delivers valuable reference data to validate numerical simulation methods for high-enthalpy flows.

L2K tests are used for the direct qualification of high-temperature materials and sensors for flight. Additionally, spectroscopic measurements in the flow field support the development of modern diagnostic techniques.

Contact
  • Volker Speelmann
    Head of Cen­tral Ex­pen­di­ture Man­age­ment
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-4103
    Fax: +49 2203 601 4115
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact
  • Ali Gülhan
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Aero­dy­nam­ics and Flow Tech­nol­o­gy
    Su­per­son­ic and Hy­per­son­ic Tech­nol­o­gy
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-2363
    Fax: +49 2203 601-2085
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact

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