Land­ing and Mo­bil­i­ty Fa­cil­i­ty (LAMA)

Lander Engineering Model (LEM) am Roboter (KR500) bereit für einen Abwurf Test
Lan­der En­gi­neer­ing Mod­el (LEM) on the robot (KR500), ready for a drop test
Image 1/2, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Lander Engineering Model (LEM) on the robot (KR500), ready for a drop test

A mod­u­lar testbed has been set up at the DLR In­sti­tute of Space Sys­tems in Bre­men to sup­port de­vel­op­ment ac­tiv­i­ties for land­ing sys­tems. The aim is to in­ves­ti­gate the touch­down be­haviour of land­ing sys­tems with re­al­is­tic sim­u­la­tions of weight, dy­nam­ics, and plan­e­tary sur­faces in or­der to de­rive find­ings that are rel­e­vant, for ex­am­ple, when land­ing on a plan­et.
Robot, LEM, and rover in the LAMA testbed
Robot, LEM, and rover in the LAMA testbed
Image 2/2, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Robot, LEM, and rover in the LAMA testbed

A mod­u­lar testbed has been set up at the DLR In­sti­tute of Space Sys­tems in Bre­men to sup­port de­vel­op­ment ac­tiv­i­ties for land­ing sys­tems. The aim is to in­ves­ti­gate the touch­down be­haviour of land­ing sys­tems with re­al­is­tic sim­u­la­tions of weight, dy­nam­ics, and plan­e­tary sur­faces in or­der to de­rive find­ings that are rel­e­vant, for ex­am­ple, when land­ing on a plan­et.

A modular testbed has been set up at the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen to support development activities for landing systems. The aim is to investigate the touchdown behaviour of landing systems with realistic simulations of weight, dynamics, and planetary surfaces in order to derive findings that are relevant, for example, when landing on a planet.

Laboratory testing of landing behaviour on planets

This large-scale facility operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) comprises a modular testbed measuring ten by four metres. The facility offers a simulated planetary surface, designed with granular soil material and selectable rock distributions. In addition, the ground and the facility can be tilted in parts (up to 30 degrees) to simulate landings on an incline, or rovers driving on slopes and dips. Another core element of the facility is a movable industrial robot system with a load capacity of 500 kilograms, which serves to guide test objects with precision.

Landing test objects can be ejected at pre-defined speeds and orientation angles in a 'drop test'. Alternatively, they can be moved with gravitational forces 'removed' by being constantly coupled to the robotic system to simulate the lower gravity on the surfaces of other celestial bodies. In addition to these test modes at a system level, component tests are also carried out with individual landing legs.

Using the facility, scientists can investigate important issues relating to tipping stability during landings on an incline or with lateral speed components, as well as landing safety on rough terrain. In some cases, these questions cannot be fully answered even with reliable numerical simulations due to the difficulty of describing the behaviour of granular surface material during the dynamic phases of movement.

Contact
  • Volker Speelmann
    Head of Cen­tral Ex­pen­di­ture Man­age­ment
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-4103
    Fax: +49 2203 601 4115
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact
  • Silvio Schröder
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Space Sys­tems
    Land­ing and Ex­plo­ration Tech­nol­o­gy
    Telephone: +49 (0) 421 24420-1220
    Fax: +49 (0) 421 24420-1120
    Robert-Hooke-Straße 7
    28359 Bremen
    Contact

Main menu