Defence & Security

DLR and I.S.A.R. work towards disaster relief in Indonesia

12 October 2018

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  • I.S.A.R.%2dKatastrophenhelfer unterstützen die Bevölkerung
    I.S.A.R. disaster relief workers help the local people

    Disaster relief workers from I.S.A.R. and DLR provide assistance to the local Sulawesi community.

  • I.S.A.R.%2dBasislager
    I.S.A.R. base camp

    On 4 October 2018, a team from the aid organisation I.S.A.R. Germany (International Search and Rescue) met up with a representative from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.

  • Disaster relief workers from I.S.A.R. and DLR are helping the local people by building a drinking water treatment plant and an emergency power generator.
  • Following the earthquake in Mexico in October 2017, this is the second successful collaboration between DLR and I.S.A.R. in a disaster zone.
  • Focus: Security, Disaster Relief

On 4 October, a team from the aid organisation I.S.A.R. Germany (International Search and Rescue) met up with a representative from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. The region had been hit by a severe earthquake and a tsunami six days earlier. Other earthquakes followed over subsequent days. The disaster relief workers from I.S.A.R. and DLR are helping the local people by building a drinking water treatment plant and providing an emergency power generator. This on-the-ground experience helps DLR to further develop technological concepts for better crisis and disaster management in future.

"The levels of suffering and damage are devastating, as the region around Palu was hit by several major natural disasters at the same time. We can help the local people here by providing free drinking water in order to ease their suffering a little," says Steven Bayer, Security Researcher at the DLR Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, who is also an integral member of the I.S.A.R. operations team on the ground and the leader of the advance team. DLR has been working closely with the aid organisation since 2016. Among other things, it is developing the camera system MACS (Modular Aerial Camera System) specially for use on unmanned aircraft, in order to assist with the search for people buried under rubble and to provide a quick overview of damage to infrastructure in crisis-struck regions.

Technologies such as autonomously flying optical reconnaissance systems can only provide quick and effective disaster relief if they are developed based on real-life scenarios. Only so much can be achieved by simulations. By deploying this technology in Indonesia, DLR-researcher Bayer is able not only to support the I.S.A.R. team, but also to gain insights into the processes, conditions and requirements of an actual relief mission. This will supplement existing knowledge with valuable practical information. The DLR researchers at the Institute of Optical Sensor Systems will evaluate this data and integrate it into the development of such technologies.

After 11 days on the ground, Steven Bayer returned to Berlin on 11 October, thus concluding the second successful collaborative operation between DLR and I.S.A.R. in a disaster area. Their first joint endeavour took place in October 2017, following the severe earthquake that struck Mexico.

  • Institute of Optical Sensor Systems

    The DLR Institute of Optical Sensor Systems researches and develops active and passive optical sensor systems for space travel, flying platforms and robotic systems. It focuses on the scientific use of the data acquired by such systems and contributes its expertise towards a great number of national and international collaborations. The Institute's vision focuses on the development of autonomous optical sensor systems analogous to, and as an extension of human visual perception.

  • Security research at DLR

    In DLR's security-related work, research and development activities relating to defence or security are planned and monitored with partners in government, science, industry and international organisations. As such, the cross-sectional field of security research combines the core strengths of established DLR programmes in the fields of aeronautics, space, energy and transport. In total, over 20 DLR institutes and facilities are contributing towards the development, testing and evaluation of technologies, systems and concepts as part of their security-related work, as well as conducting analysis and assessments of security-related applications.

  • I.S.A.R. Germany

    I.S.A.R. Germany (International Search and Rescue) is a non-profit, purely donor-based aid organisation. It was founded in Duisburg in 2003. A specialist rescue team is assembled in the wake of devastating accidents and disasters, and is normally deployed to the respective area within 12 hours. After severe earthquakes and flooding, the rescue team works alongside the German Search and Rescue Dog Organisation (BRH), which usually searches for people buried under rubble using sniffer dogs, saving those that they find and providing immediate medical assistance. Since 2007, I.S.A.R. has been operating in Germany under the auspices of the United Nations and was the first team in the world to be audited and certified as a 'Medium Team' by the UN organisation INSARAG.

Last modified:
16/10/2018 13:51:38

Contacts

 

Philipp Burtscheidt
German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Media Relations

Tel.: +49 2203 601-2323

Fax: +49 2203 601-3249
Ralf Berger
German Aerospace Center (DLR)

DLR Institute of Optical Sensor Systems

Tel.: +49 30 67055-572
Steven Bayer
German Aerospace Center (DLR)

DLR Institute of Optical Sensor Systems

Tel.: +49 30 67055-7958