Cer­berus Fos­sae, shaped by vol­can­ism and tec­ton­ics

Cerberus Fossae, shaped by volcanism and tectonics
Cer­berus Fos­sae, shaped by vol­can­ism and tec­ton­ics
Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

Cerberus Fossae, shaped by volcanism and tectonics

The land­scape in the Cer­berus Fos­sae re­gion seems to have been cut by a knife. The tec­ton­ic frac­ture struc­tures were formed less than 100 mil­lion years ago, per­haps as re­cent­ly as 10 mil­lion years ago. This can al­so be seen in the pro­file of the fos­sae, which are bor­dered by ex­treme­ly steep walls, al­most ver­ti­cal in places and more than 500 me­tres tall in places, which have hard­ly been flat­tened by ero­sion. The SEIS seis­mome­ter on NASA's In­Sight mis­sion was able to de­tect two quakes here, about 1700 kilo­me­tres east of the land­ing site, quite ac­cu­rate­ly and an­oth­er with some­what greater un­cer­tain­ty. The im­age was ac­quired on 27 Jan­uary 2018 by the High Res­o­lu­tion Stereo Cam­era (HRSC) on board the Eu­ro­pean Mars Ex­press space­craft.

The landscape in the Cerberus Fossae region seems to have been cut by a knife. The tectonic fracture structures were formed less than 100 million years ago, perhaps as recently as 10 million years ago. This can also be seen in the profile of the fossae, which are bordered by extremely steep walls, almost vertical in places and more than 500 metres tall in places, which have hardly been flattened by erosion. The SEIS seismometer on NASA's InSight mission was able to detect two quakes here, about 1700 kilometres east of the landing site, quite accurately and another with somewhat greater uncertainty. The image was acquired on 27 January 2018 by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board the European Mars Express spacecraft.

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