Dornier DO 228-101 (D-CODE)

Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft
Dornier DO 228-101 re­search air­craft
Image 1/4, Credit: © DLR. All rights reserved

Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft

The air­craft is used to con­duct flow stud­ies on wings, test op­ti­cal sen­sors to gen­er­ate ar­ti­fi­cial ex­ter­nal views, ex­per­i­ment with new flight guid­ance sys­tems and fly re­mote sens­ing mis­sions.
Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft in the air
Dornier DO 228-101 re­search air­craft in the air
Image 2/4, Credit: © DLR. All rights reserved

Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft in the air

The Dornier DO 228-101 re­search air­craft (D-CODE) is used as a fly­ing re­search plat­form at the Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR) Flight Ex­per­i­ments Fa­cil­i­ty.
Laminar glove
Lam­i­nar glove
Image 3/4, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Laminar glove

DO 228 D-CODE flight test­ing a lam­i­nar glove.
Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft
Dornier DO 228-101 re­search air­craft
Image 4/4, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Dornier DO 228-101 research aircraft

The Dornier DO 228-101 re­search air­craft (D-CODE) is used as a fly­ing re­search plat­form at the Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR) Flight Ex­per­i­ments Fa­cil­i­ty.

The Dornier DO 228-101 (D-CODE), operated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) Research Flight Department in Braunschweig, serves as a carrier system for flight tests and experiments for DLR institutes and numerous external customers. The aircraft is used, for example, to perform flow investigations on wings, test optical sensors used to generate simulated external views, as well as to validate flight guidance technologies and fly remote sensing systems. The aircraft can be remotely piloted using an experimental, digital autopilot and a data link.

Unrestricted view of Earth

This research aircraft is unique in the multitude of experimental possibilities it offers to users. Unlike conventional aircraft, it is possible to attach external equipment – such as sensors or probes – to hard-points on the fuselage and wings of the DO 228-101.

Two camera ports installed in the cabin floor allow the use of camera systems with an unrestricted view of Earth's surface. Computers for conducting experiments can be accommodated in specially manufactured racks fitted in the rectangular fuselage; the onboard electrical system supplies the necessary power. A variety of data are recorded in-flight by a measurement system and are immediately available for experimental purposes.

The aircraft's experimental autopilot system will be of particular benefit to future projects, such as those testing uncrewed flight systems or novel approach procedures. Flight routes or manoeuvres can therefore be directly controlled by the person performing the experiment, using the aircraft's autopilot. It is also possible to control the aircraft from a ground station via a data link.

The DO 228-101 has been supporting DLR’s research flight operations for over 30 years and has proven to be robust and reliable. Its equipment has been constantly modernised and developed over the years, allowing the aircraft to address a wide range of future applications.

Contact
  • Volker Speelmann
    Head of Re­search In­fras­truc­tures
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-4103
    Fax: +49 2203 601 4115
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact
  • Martin Gestwa
    Head of Flight Fa­cil­i­ty Braun­schweig
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Flight Ex­per­i­ments
    Telephone: +49 531 295-2240
    Lilienthalplatz 7
    38108 Braunschweig
    Contact
  • Burkhard Wigger
    Head of De­part­ment
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Flight Ex­per­i­ments
    Man­age­ment
    Telephone: +49 531 295 2930
    Lilienthalplatz 7
    38108 Braunschweig
    Contact

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