Ro­tor Test Fa­cil­i­ty Göt­tin­gen (RTG)

Rotor test facility
Ro­tor test fa­cil­i­ty
Image 1/5, Credit: DLR

Rotor test facility

The ro­tor test stand has a 65-kilo­watt ro­tor drive. The fa­cil­i­ty can be op­ti­mal­ly con­fig­ured for the re­quired mea­sure­ments due to the choice of dif­fer­ent ro­tor heads that may be se­lect­ed.
Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements
Par­ti­cle Im­age Ve­locime­try (PIV) mea­sure­ments
Image 2/5, Credit: DLR

Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements

A Par­ti­cle Im­age Ve­locime­try (PIV) sys­tem con­sists of four cam­eras and a pulse laser.
Camera system and LED illumination
Cam­era sys­tem and LED il­lu­mi­na­tion
Image 3/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Camera system and LED illumination

Cam­era sys­tem and LED il­lu­mi­na­tion of a 'Stereo Pat­tern Recog­ni­tion' mea­sure­ment.
Telemetry system and swashplate
Teleme­try sys­tem and swash­plate
Image 4/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Telemetry system and swashplate

Teleme­try sys­tem and swash­plate of the RTG ro­tor head.
Instrumented four-blade rotor
In­stru­ment­ed four-blade ro­tor
Image 5/5, Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

Instrumented four-blade rotor

In­stru­ment­ed four-blade ro­tor with the con­trol room in the back­ground.

Researchers at the DLR Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology are able to measure complex flow phenomena such as those that occur on helicopter rotors, and to evaluate the resulting data automatically.

Measuring and evaluating complex airflows

The Helicopters Department (AS-HEL) large-scale facility is based on an automated system for evaluating the data obtained from rotor testing, which was developed at DLR. The facility consists of a measurement section where turbulence-free airflows are generated, and the actual rotor test stand, which has a 65-kilowatt rotor drive. The facility can be optimally configured for the required measurements due to the choice of different rotor heads that may be selected.

In particular, transient measurements in the transonic range are possible. Optical density measurements can also be performed on rapidly rotating propellers or rotors. Transient velocity field measurements at frequencies of up to one kilohertz are also possible. The primary aim of the RTG (1MG) is to provide measurement data to assist with the development of measurement technologies for helicopter aerodynamics. The facility’s hardware and software are suitable for industrial use and thus for winning new projects from clients.

The scientific findings of the test series are very significant for DLR and its projects. The large-scale RTG facility allows commitments to be met in terms of the Aviation Research Programme (Luftfahrtforschungsprogramm, LuFo) of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and and Climate Action (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Klimaschutz; BMWK) and projects by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; DFG), as well as maintaining and building up national partnerships (university education, Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctoral programmes) and international cooperative efforts (for example, with NLR, ONERA and NASA). In addition, the RTG gives DLR unique national capacities and capabilities compared with its counterparts in the UK and France.

Contact
  • Volker Speelmann
    Head of Re­search In­fras­truc­tures
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Telephone: +49 2203 601-4103
    Fax: +49 2203 601 4115
    Linder Höhe
    51147 Cologne
    Contact
  • Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Markus Raffel
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    In­sti­tute of Aero­dy­nam­ics and Flow Tech­nol­o­gy
    He­li­copters
    Telephone: +49 551 709-2817

    Contact

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