13. October 2021
Collaboration with Peter Schilling for the first mission of Matthias Maurer

We proud­ly present ... the DLR 'Cos­mic Kiss' mis­sion video

ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer
ESA as­tro­naut Matthias Mau­r­er
Image 1/3, Credit: ESA/NASA

ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer

Of­fi­cial por­trait of ESA as­tro­naut Matthias Mau­r­er wear­ing NASA's Ex­trave­hic­u­lar Mo­bil­i­ty Unit (EMU) space­suit ahead of his Cos­mic Kiss mis­sion to the In­ter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion (ISS). This space­suit is worn by as­tro­nauts dur­ing US space­walks out­side the In­ter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion.
‘Cosmic Kiss’ – a declaration of love for space
‘Cos­mic Kiss’ – a dec­la­ra­tion of love for space
Image 2/3, Credit: ESA

‘Cosmic Kiss’ – a declaration of love for space

Matthias Mau­r­er was in­spired by the Ne­bra Sky Disc, the old­est re­al­is­tic de­pic­tion of our night sky, and the ‘Pi­o­neer Plaques’ and ‘Voy­ager Gold­en Records’ for the de­sign of his ‘Cos­mic Kiss’ mis­sion patch. The lat­ter were da­ta stor­age de­vices bear­ing knowl­edge about hu­mankind that were sent out in­to the Uni­verse on the US Pi­o­neer and Voy­ager space­craft. The mis­sion patch fea­tures spe­cif­ic cos­mic el­e­ments such as Earth, the Moon and the Pleiades star clus­ter, along­side Mars as a des­ti­na­tion for ex­plo­ration in the com­ing decade. The In­ter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion (ISS) is shown in the shape of a heart, rep­re­sent­ing the hu­man heart­beat be­tween Earth and the Moon.
Matthias Maurer will fly to the ISS in autumn 2021
Matthias Mau­r­er will fly to the ISS in au­tumn 2021
Image 3/3, Credit: ESA

Matthias Maurer will fly to the ISS in autumn 2021

In au­tumn 2021, Matthias Mau­r­er will be­come the lat­est Ger­man as­tro­naut from the Eu­ro­pean Space Agen­cy (ESA) to fly to the In­ter­na­tion­al Space Sta­tion (ISS). This was con­firmed at an in­ter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence held by NASA, ESA, Roscos­mos and JAXA on 14 De­cem­ber 2020.
  • The DLR mission video shows German ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer’s preparations for his Cosmic Kiss mission to the ISS.
  • Collaboration with German singer/songwriter Peter Schilling and his song 'All the things you are'.
  • Focus: Space, International Space Station, human spaceflight, Cosmic Kiss

The countdown has begun – in the early hours of 30 October 2021, at 02:21 local time (07:21 CET), German ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard a commercial SpaceX Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It is a premiere for the 51-year-old materials scientist from Sankt Wendel, Saarland, who has been a member of the European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut corps since July 2015 and is one of seven currently active ESA astronauts. Maurer will live and work in microgravity for six months as a member of ISS Expedition 66. He will be the second ESA and first German astronaut to fly to the Space Station aboard a SpaceX spacecraft of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, after Frenchman Thomas Pesquet. Together with crewmembers Raja Chari (Commander), Thomas Marshburn (Pilot) and Kayla Barron (Mission Specialist) from NASA, he will be involved in many experiments on the ISS as a mission specialist. His daily routine includes helping conduct more than 100 experiments, 36 of them from Germany, until his planned return in mid-April 2022.

DLR 'Cosmic Kiss' mission video
The DLR mission video shows German ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer's preparations for his first space mission. The music is provided by German songwriter, musician and space enthusiast Peter Schilling.

The DLR mission video can also be found on Vimeo.

To set the mood for the 'Cosmic Kiss' mission, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) has produced a video that shows highlights of Maurer's preparations for his first space mission. He completed his basic training as an ESA astronaut in September 2018 and was nominated for his first ISS mission in December 2020. The video shows a review of the past 18 months of intensive astronaut training. The music is provided by German songwriter, musician and space enthusiast Peter Schilling. DLR and Schilling have previously collaborated on the trailer for the 'horizons' mission of Maurer's German predecessor on the ISS, Alexander Gerst. Schilling's 80s classic 'Major Tom (Coming Home)' accompanied Gerst to the ISS.

For Maurer's mission video, DLR chose the recent song 'All the things you are'. Schilling begins his ballad with the words "A hundred times you've lost the way and faced the world alone, a hundred miles since you’ve been running, a hundred miles out on your own," which is a personal look back at and insight into life. From DLR's point of view, the lyrics, particularly the refrain, "All the things you are and all the things you’ll ever be," reflect the change of perspective that Matthias Maurer as a materials scientist and astronaut will personally experience during his mission in space. At the same time, Maurer is an ambassador for all of us 'astronauts' who must treat our unique and vulnerable 'spaceship Earth' responsibly and conscientiously.

DLR is involved in Matthias Maurer's Cosmic Kiss mission in many ways. The German Space Agency at DLR, based in Bonn, is responsible for selecting and coordinating the German experiments and supplies for the mission and manages the German ESA contribution to the ISS programme on behalf of the Federal Government. Germany is currently the largest contributor to the ISS programme within ESA.

Contact
  • Elisabeth Mittelbach
    Com­mu­ni­ca­tions
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Ger­man Space Agen­cy at DLR
    Telephone: +49 228 447-385
    Königswinterer Straße 522-524
    53227 Bonn
    Contact
  • Fabian Walker
    Ger­man Aerospace Cen­ter (DLR)
    Ger­man Space Agen­cy at DLR
    Strat­e­gy and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions
    Telephone: +49 228 447-124
    Königswinterer Straße 522-524
    53227 Bonn
    Contact
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